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Full text of "Elchanet (New York, N.Y.), 1963"

r 



S I ch a net 



1963 



Yeshiva University High School for Girls 
of Manhattan 

462 West 58 Street 
New York, N. Y. 




,"îs» Tjr ii^Vj? TiT]r\ 'y^^^ ia '7mn imaV 
nsiym mm ms3 niE^n nso ns mu^npa ijjh 
"73 "iB'an nmn imi^oi^i ijnmu"? vsasa lya 





TO THE INDIVIDUAL .... 



"The wind is an atlribute of the individual. There 
is no such thing as a collective brain. There is no 
such thing as a collective thought. An agreement 
reached by a group of men is only a compromise or 
an average drawn upon many individual thoughts. 
It is a secondary consequence. The primary act — 
the process of reason — must te performed by 
each man alone. We can divide a meal among 
many men. We cannot digest it in a collective 
stomach. No mon con use his lungs to breathe for 
another man. No man can use his brain to think for 
another. All the functions of body and spirit are 
private. They cannot be shared or transferred." 

Ayn Rand 



AND ALL HE SYMBOLIZES 



IN MEMORY 

of our 

BELOVED TEACHER 

MR. ISIDORE EDELMAN 




TO THE GRADUATING CLASS OF 1963; 

I wish lo lake lliis oppoitunity lo congratulate 
you upon the successful completion of your 
studies at Yeshiva University High School for 
Girls of Manhattan. 

Throughout history the Jewish woman has 
played a vital role in our tradition. She has been 
the hrst teacher of our youth, introducing them 
to the vast treasures of Jewish culture. Hers has 
been the responsibility of imbuing the home with 
the spirit of G-dliness that is the sole foundation 
for the truly moral life. Thus, the Jewish woman 



has made possible the continuation of our sacred 
heritage down through the ages. 

You who have benefited from this comprehen- 
sive training bear the obligation of carrying out 
the traditions of Torah as you mature into woman- 
hood. 1 trust you will be, by your future thoughts 
and actions, a living symbol of the spiritual and 
intellectual ideals of your alma mater. 

Sincerely yours, 

SAMUEL BELKIN 

President 



TO THE GRADUATING CLASS OF 1963 

On this joyous occasion in your young lives, 
when you have reached an important milestone 
in your preparation for the fullness of the days 
to come, I am happy to greet you and to wish you 
well. You have completed successfully the course 
of studies prescribed in the Hebrew and English 
departments of our high school — some with dis- 
tinction ^- all with credit to yourselves, your par- 
ents, and to our great institution. 

During the most formative years of your lives, 
you have actively participated in the harmonious 
blending and fusion of Jewish lore and secular 
learnings. You have received instruction not only 
in the subjects contained in the curriculum of the 
public high schools, such as English, foreign 
languages, sciences, mathematics, social studies 
and the like, but also, by precept and e.xample, 
you have learned the message and meaning of our 
priceless heritage — the concepts, teachings, tra- 
ditions and ideals of universal Israel. 

Whether you choose as your life work some 
phase of human knowledge and dedicate your- 
selves to study and teaching, or give your energies 
to the fields ol daily human needs, or devote 
yourselves to the realm of the spirit, remember the 



philosophy and the way of life that you have been 
taught here. Though the problems that you, as 
Jews, must face in this confused world are not 
always clear, you must, each and all of you, cling 
to those elements of our cultural past that have 
made us great as a people. It is upon these cul- 
tural backgrounds which are strongly rooted in 
our study of the Torah, and not upon false values 
and strange ideologies that you must build your 
personalities and your future lives. 

You, graduates of the Yeshiva University High 
School for Girls Manhattan, are pioneers. You 
have had an education different from that of the 
rest of the Jewish youth of this country. You have 
had an opportunity lo learn the value and sig- 
nilicance of intensive Jewish study, and to gain 
a deeper insight into, and truer understanding of 
the Jewish consciousness and soul. With this 
great common bond, you are strengthened to with- 
stand the material influences of the time and are 
less prone lo fall prey to the disintegrating forces 
which are threatening to sweep away everything 
that is dear and precious in life. 

Strengthen that bond; united, assert yourselves 
and your influence in the lives of our youth, so 
that by your example you may prove that these 



years in Yeshiva University High School for Girls 
Manhattan, have not been in vain, and that the 
instruction and the inspiration you received here 
shall be a blessing lo you and to those who are 
to be influenced by you. Continue to be one with 
the Yeshiva, to accept and to feel its influence. 
Unite under the banner of the ideals for which 
your school stands so that its spirit may widen 
and deepen, a current of faith and culture in 
American Jewry. 

SHELLEY R. SAFHIRE, 

Director, Y.U.H.S. s 





Deal- Graduates: 

It is my pleasure, once again, to 
congratulate the students who have 
completed their course of study in 
our high school, and who are ready 
to face the problems which the next 
step in life ordains. Your past four 
years have been extremely impor- 
tant. During these formative years, 
you have been exposed to a variety 
of teaching and have been given, in 
contents and thought, the necessary 
tools for a constructive and reward- 
ing life. Most of you have absorbed 
the essentials sufficiently to appre- 
ciate their effect now. Others will 
not realize their influence until 
much later. All of you, by select- 
ing our double program of Hebrew 
and General Studies, have indi- 
cated your willingness to accept and 
assimilate the wisdom of our Torah 
and the knowledge of our contem- 
porary civilization. 

You embark at this time upon a 
new voyage. College will prove to 
be a challenge to you. No longer 
will you be sheltered and directed. 
You will be called upon to make 
decisions, to form new attitudes, 
and to combat diverse influences. 
You will be forced to choose a pro- 
lession, to select your mate, and 
perhaps to move to a far and dis- 
tant place. It is expected that your 
decisions will be guided and influ- 
enced by the ethical and spiritual 
values which have been inculcated 
in you by your primary and second- 
ary schools. 



I am convinced that you are pre- 
pared for your task, and that you 
will be successful in all your under- 
takings. 

My blessings and my good wishes 
go with you. 

Sincerely. 

MARTIN LILKHi 

Administrator 



y'strn 

DDDb nxn '3X — i:aa nmsji 
pann nsipnn ns nnnx D'''7a2 
.m:nnsn d':!:' ymx iiran mayti» 
inN P1DD3 II ni'TDn'r u!anu!n 
naana nnns n^D» ;j3'73'? yn'i:? 
,«»'? •>'7i:?n) ",1:11:;': sy ^o^ mini 
.nasn — ht nDDn-n''n3 ima'? .(va 
.minn Ta'?2 pV nny mj/i:; nmn 
.uVi:' npiay nniM naann 'niTii' 
.pa'7n u;-iieii:i nr iia'jE? mon 'jn 
Tan mns'? 'jsin pa nnx '731 
."naDna» — rro nx 

13'7!i' IDD-n'n .'73,1 K? .IT '73X 

:':iy nm iiy p'? tn-'b raxnn 
"ion mm,/ ."njni:^'? '751 icn mm» 
mx f3 mii^'n ,-ijnMn 'mr — 
.mnni — an mn'n "n .nnn'? 
.nminnnn nrn'? □•■'713'' un î'n 
iJN DNi .-'Ji;;'? lan sin 'iin^ '73 
•"ninM iiax'? Dnmn'7 t-n D'yir 
.UV 31D1 inii'N — 
N'xin'7 njyinif p'73'7 '7nKa 'ik 
.'7ïiDn "7^ n3a nin iia'jn ns 
.'7Nny''a ,-^3^3'7 n:"m 

nayn nnan '7,ija 




^s/ctcuitu 



1 

9 
6 

S 




Mrs. R. Barshad 



Miss C. Adierblu 



Dr. A. Bertraa 





'4 '"^"m^ 



hi. "' V 
Mrs. F. Faerba 



&^ 



â\^ 



Mr. S. Goldstein 






^gw 



Miss L. lllig 




Mrs. D. Indyk 






Jik 




Mrs. E. Levinsoa 




:2l 





Dr. R. Pascal 








Mrs. F. Wilkir 



Nol s/tou;n: 
Miss C. Baer 
Mrs. E. Franklin 
Miss G. Laffargue 
Miss E. Ofri 
Mr. S. Siegel 
Mrs. R. Slem 



1 

Mr. A. Eli 





Rabbi A. Melzge 



NoI shown: 

Mrs. R. Faskowitz 



^^ 





Miss N. Rabinowilz 



Rabbi A. SUcop 



J 




Mr. A. Sleif 




^ «(Kïi 



Mr. S. Schwarlzbard 



Miss D. Stra: 




Mrs. S. S/.ccïcdrowilzky 




Miss D. Keehn. Secretary 



Luis Espinoza and Johnny Labo\ , Mainlt-nance 




L^raduciteâ 



1 

9 
6 
8 






TZIONA ABRAMSON' 



r^2ViL 



1T]H uwni n7n;i mm 

One of ihe Bobbsey twins. 
Sezonia and counterpart 
almost started a loolc-alike 
craze . . . speaks Hebrew 
liKe a Sabra, so no wonder 
she s our Hebrew editor . . . 
a veritable tiger wnen 
aroused to debate . . . nice 
girl, iKat Tziona. 



Aliya: Hehreiv editor. El- 
ci^anet: Hainvaser; class 
president 



JUDI BENDHEIM 



n'^nnn^ 



n^ '731 'T'pui 'nntu 




Without Judi. last years 
Chem class would have 
starved . . . striking a pose 
of charming dàsnahille, she 
provided the art class with 
a model . , . but whal is 
there to be said of our hrst 
prospective bride? 



Courier; volleyball team; 
service squad; dramatics 



BARBARA 
BIENSTOCK 



rh'^a. 



Is there a barb in the inno- 
cence of that honeyed 
voice? . . . her female con- 
temporaries can t be alone 
in their admiration of her 
good looks . . . coordinating 
a democracy sing, Barbara 
revealed her true colors: 
reel, white, and blue. 



Aliya; class president, sec- 
retaiy. treasurer; Guild 




PAULA COHEN 



NAOMI CYPERSTEIN 



njana 




m^'as 



nriuj HDi n^3^ n?] 



DENISE DOPPELT 



A very quiet girl . . . one of 
the pearls of our EnglisK 
class, Paula fias proved slie 
can speak loud . . . because 
of lier helpful cooperation, 
the B class finds itself in- 
debted to her . . . thank 
you, Paula. 



Class secretary; service 
stiuacl; Guild 





Crowning touches to fash- 
ion show . . . her good 
looks and popularity make 
it understandable that the 
sparkle in her eyes was 
matched by the one on her 
finger . . . experience with 
substitutes teaches that de- 
fending Marx does not pay. 



Cheerleade 
Guild 



ihrar 



n*?nan 



nnisn pira i?DE] r^ 

Denise cidas a touch of 
humor to our dull existence 
with her hilarious antics 
. . . sometimes known as 
Cleopatra, she nevertheless 
managed to portray Caesar, 
providing the very summit 
of our freshman play . . . 
helllllij! 



Lib, 



rarian; service s 



quad 




ROSLYN FRANCUS 



n3W2J 




y"^r— ><^< 



JOANNE FEUERSTEIN 



K3^'"'n 



Hailing from Baaston. 
Mass.. Joanne is staunch 
in her political convictions 
. . . her mind, sharpened 
by the study of gemorrah, 
has stood her in good stead 
. . . Say, are you Feuer- 
stein s daughter? 



Tries to play straight-man 
to Liz . . J her compositions 
amaze the class and over- 
whelm even Mr. Pearl . . . 
the fact that she survived 
Chemistry proves her ca- 
pable of withstanding the 
rigors of surgical training. 



Afiya; Courier; class presi- 
dent; class treasurer; art 
committees 




ANl FREEDMAN 



nsnx 



This girl is one of Mr. Eli- 
ezri s favorites, whenever 
he has the pleasure of her 
company . . . versatile in 
the sciences— Bio: ingeni- 
ous coiffeuse . . . Chem: 
cook and card sharp . . . 
last and least. Physics; 
math marvel. 



Class treasurer; librarian 



::JilM: 



Cheerleader 




BERNICE FRIEDMAN 



n^-'a 



DT?n i^iiN 

"Quelle honeur!" Who, 
our Bunnyrabbit? Couldn't 
be! ... a talented girl, this 
one . . . amateur composer 
. . . fine athlete . . . en- 
thusiastic cheerleader . . . 
brownie baker . . . we ve 
just two questions: Aipho 
Baila? and. How did Peter 
Pan become Arista Presi- 
dent? 



President, Aliya; class pies- 
dent; volleyball team ; 
cheerleader; leader, Chalil 
club; service squad; dra 
inatics 



LEDA FRIEDMAN 



nxi» 



Surely the most impeccably 
dressed senior, Leda is a 
delight to be seen with . . . 
Hebrew her forte . . . has a 
fantastic memory for dates 
. . . together with her buddy 
Helene, she stirs up much 
excitement. 



Vo((evDa(( team 





BARBARA GALLANT 



?^n^a 



umi rui numtD \m 

Arbitrator of many a class 
dispute . . . considering the 
natural resources, she does 
a magnificent job of beau- 
tifying the senior class . . . 
seriously, Bobbie is ad- 
mired by all for her matur- 
ity, sensibility and level- 
headedness. 



Class president; booster 




GRACE GLATSTEIN 




FLORENCE 
GOLDSCHMIDT 



LEA HESS 



HK^ 



Healing from the Heights, 
Hess is hep on horas . . . 
her melodious voice and 
enthusiastic approach to all 
her endeavors make her a 
horn feader . . . keeps her 
hands firmly at her sides at 
all times. 



nam 



HKÎJ 



Vice president, Aliya; vice 
president. GO.; class pres- 
ident; volleyball team ; 
Guild; dramatics 



Glatl . . . our only Sabra 
. . . her sarcasms are too 
clever for many teachers . . . 
this poor girl sat through 
Mishrba class stunned for 
several days before she rec- 
ognized the language the 
good rabbi was speaking. 



Cfass freasurer; Courier 



najnnn run 

Emphasis on ine schniiat 
. . . send this girl to law 
school . . . Nlrs. Faeiber s 
prescription : for pure ag- 
gravation, call on Florence 
. . . Mr. Pearl heartily 
agrees . . . aon t worry. 
Florence, we still love you. 



Class vice president; 
booster 




JUDY HOCHBERGER 



n^n^n^ 



Rarely in trouble, but when 
she is. she really gets the 
booK thrown at her . . . has 
proved on many occasions 
that she is unable to die , . . 
which teacher would like to 
Kill this mocking bird? 





CLAIRE HOROWITZ 



SANDRA HOROWITZ 



Class secretary: booster; 
Guild: stage design: art 
committees 



HT» 



n^a*»?? 




Dpuj iT'niTnj ■pD 

One of the few who man- 
age to keep their hungar in 
check till seventh period 
. . . four years here have 
made Claire what she is 
today— to quote her favor- 
ite teacher: "A neurotic, 
brainless creature" . . . wel- 
come! 



nnnuj in n^ni 

Cute and smiling . . . as- 
pires to a career in the 
world of art . . . why is 
Miss Guncler afraid to 
bowl with her? . . . says 
our schools poet laureate: 
"Sandy, a little studying 
would be just dandy." 



Class vice president: 
booster 



Manager, service squad: li 
brarian 



SARAH 
JAROSLAVVICZ 



SARAH JOSEPH 



AVIS KLUGHAUPT 



nn^ 



nni27 



nmsii 



ngu T3OT WHW iiD m 



njn''n nnu nrinn nn 



nipi niRH 'yn n^jinoj 






Sarah will surely go down 
in history as a woman of 
valor . . . hailer-of-cabs . . . 
pyromanic . . . sprayer-of- 
rooms-and-teachers . . . of- 
nce-o-phile . . . inciter-of- 
mobs . . . those oranges 
smell delicious, even from 
the bacl; row. 



Other Bobbsey . . . upon 
entering our institution. 
Sarah was awarded the 
door prize: life membership 
on the scenery committee 
. . . the state of her fellows 
was no doubt the determin- 
ing factor in her decision to 
enter nursing. 



Perfect face, ruddy cheeks, 
and always-cheerful nature 
... a faithful and spirited 
Bnei-Akivanic ... a favor- 
ite of most Hebrew teachers 
. . . were it not for our dear 
Avis, the Elchanet would 
never have reacnea its 
quota. 



Aliya; class vice president; 
cneeneader; service squad 



Librarian; Guild, stage de- 
sign; art committees 



Volloyball team: dramatics 






FRADIE KNOBEL 



HT'-lSJ 



SUSAN KOOK 



1*10K 



ADELE KORN 



^V-T^'K 



inT] ns^i 7Daj nniu 

Diligent doojler . . . ever- 
erady and versatile school 
musician . . . proclaimed by 
Miss Guncier as an artist— 
on paper as well as on eyes 
. . . her friend Roger comes 
in handy for the casting of 
school productions. 



Debaling manager; class 
president; dramatics; school 
pianist 



m)ii'7 nui DUD7 noji? 

A descendant of the re- 
nowned Rav Kook. it's no 
wonder . . . conforming to 
the principles of her S.S. 
class makes her another ad- 
mirer of the teacher ... is 
her mischievous nature 
something she acquired 
from her twin brother? 



Class treasurer; lihrarian 



Obviously a 6:00 riser, 
why is Adele a member of 
Miss Keehn's 8:30 club? 
. . . talented co-creator of 
Lilker-dog and designer of 
senior pin ... do the bars 
on the pin represent those 
on the school windows? 



Stage design: art commit- 
tees 



DEBORAH KOSINER 



SHARON KRIGER 



BLANCHE 
KRONEGOLD 



nnnan 



T\ltS3 



nJa^^a 



Frist-class mimic . . . one 
of llie iKree musketeers of 
Propkets class . . . how 
many girls nave attenclea a 
prom througn contacts? . . 
the compositions of all 
those harcl-vvorking fresh- 
men, up in smoke! . . . good 
show, old girl. 



DIN ^nr\ n^'Ei^g' 

Commuting from way out 
in Laurelton, Sharon is ad- 
mired for her diligence and 
punctuality (except during 
water main trouble) . . . 
bright, alert, and pretty, it 
was no surprise that she 
was voted Cornell s "Queen 
of Young Israel. 



nun mnn nnyi 

Cute smile, black hair, 
smart clothes . . . stunned 
us with her sky-high his- 
tory mark . . . the fact that 
Blanche is ejivied and ad- 
mired is shown by the rob- 
bery rate of her notes, coats, 
etc. 



Aliya; class president ; class 
secretary; service squad 



Class secretary; class treas- 
urer 



Literary editor, Elchanet; 
feature editor. Courier; 
class president; service 
squad 






CHANNY KUPIETZKY 



ESTHER KURZ 



RIVKAH LANDESMAN 



r^in 



niNJi R'n nninoj 



inOK 



nnDra nnng n"'3 



npni 



D'-s^'N'? iDn m^ij 






Answers five out of ten and 
gets 100 . . . representing 
the N.A.A.C.P., Channy 
offered to accompany Rabbi 
Melzger on liis next free- 
dom ride . . . BOOM! 
"Wfiat was that. Kupi- 
etzky?" "Mothing." "Then 
what's hanging from the 
ceiling? " 



Her serious nature compels 
us to abstain from levity 
. . . history-minded. Esther 
believes in the feuda\ sys- 
tem ... an advocator of 
honesty as the best pohcy 
. . . serious or not. this dark 
girl's laughter is amazingly 
contagious. 



Our crusader for tzneus 
and Jackson's demagoguery 
. her coming to us from 
McKeesport, Pa. in the 
third year of high school 
did not hinder Rivkah's 
popularity . . . noted for her 
writing ability and her un- 
failing courage. 



Class vice president 



Class secretary: Guild 



Class vice president: class 
treasurer: Guild 



FRANCES LEVITT 



SHULAMITH LIFSHITZ 



HT^'On 



n'^yiï^iiD 



DEANNE MAYEFSKY 



^niiau 131' iniTiD 



nJiuj'? ^v TDn mm 



n32?1® 





D^mnn n njtuiojD 



In spite of popular opinion, 
Deanne s temper does not 
matcn her hair . . . proof 
lies in her very mild clras- 
tisemenls of those who did 
not meet the fifty-dollar 
goal . . . one question; how 
does DM. become CF.? 



Those who donated books 
to our library do not de- 
serve as much credit as 
does Fran who donated 
two years of her life . . . 
member of the Port Au- 
thority Club ... it s bingo, 
its dots, nope— it s jotto! 



A 1 i y a ; head lihrarian; 
Courier; booster, dramatics 



Were a poll tal<en to de- 
termine the senior liked by 
everyone, there would be 
no doubt as to the winner 
. . . Faerber's first mate . . . 
collector of cartoons . . . not 
in the boot, under the lock- 
ers . . . shut up. Shulaniith. 

Class secretary; class treas- 
urer; Guild 



Business manager, Elcha- 
net ; business manager. 
Courier; class president; 
Guild 





SHIFRA MEYROWITZ 



mjîu 



m in'' niu ^3w 



RUTH MONDERER 



r\^^^\ 



■n''nin]ni in nn nuaidj 



CHERYL MAZA 



inoK 



u'mj] mi U'7M} nm 



Note that pose; . . . mah 
zeh. Maza? ... in spile of 
Cheryl s current hiclclown 
residence, we can t help Lut 
notice her striking resem- 
blance to a certain well- 
known model . . . she keeps 
the school s magazines in 
circulation. 



r. CO.; Col 




Left our formidable admin- 
istrator aghast with the 
bold declaration: I dont 
want to go to college ' . . . 
(we wonder how many 
others would like to follow 
suit) . . . how s that for pre- 
cision, thirty - live - word 
Meyrowitz? 




If Ruthie can t answer a 
history question, there s al- 
ways Anita to redeem the 
family honor ... a staunch 
defender of her native 
Cuba even during times of 
crisis . . . known to Massad- 
niks as Mon Derrière. 



Aliya; Editor-in chief, El- 
chanet; Hamvaser; editor. 
Courier Bulletin: librarian: 
leader, dance club 



Class secretary: dramatii 





ADELE NUSSBACHER 



BONNIE NATHAN 



ns^'Ti? 



HELENE NUTKIS 



nV 



Hislorical or liysleiical . . . 
too bad coloring is lost in 
photographs — Bonnie has 
beautiful blue eyes . . . slill 
mocleslly thinks her election 
to the presidency a joke . . . 
famous last words: "I'm not 
being ^ spiteful, I'm just 
bored. " 



R'n ID nnojD 

A regular Kathryn Murray 
on ice . . . keeps her class- 
mates laughing ... a quot- 
able quote never misses 
Aaeel's ear or pen . . . not 
successful only within the 
walls of our establishment, 
but in non-academic pur- 
suits as well. 



Seruice squad 



rrr\ 



]V2 miJïïlN "''PDl ITll^ 

Petite brownettes as cute as 
Helene are not easy to 
come by . . . above the norm 
... a ma.chaya to look at 
... a true Massadnik . . . 
then why do we feel she 
needs a strong dose of no- 
doz? 



Class prcsidenl : librarian: 
service squad; dramatics 




Stag 
tees 




HELEN PRAGER 



mn 



in nrjpDu d^t^ 

It would surprise many to 
learn that our top artist is 
also a top athlete . . . teach- 
ers are held in constant ter- 
ror of her frequent ques- 
tions . . . saved by the bell? 
no, by Mr. Steif. 



Art editor, Elchanet: Ham- 
vaser; Courier; class presi- 
dent; basketball team; stage 
design 




MIRI REIFMAN 



Q'"753 



Our hltle blond dancer is 
also known as Riffi and 
Mimi ... a conscientious 
student, she is a favorite of 
leachers ... is there a con- 
nection between the names 
in her family and her pro- 
hciency in French? 



Aliya; Haniuaser; class sec- 
retary: class treasurer; li- 
brarian: leader, dance club; 
service squad, dramatics 



GAYLE REISMAN 



nVj:i 



njnn nann n^^u nnin 

Gayle can lell us that it is 
not only through misdeeds 
that one can become in- 
volved with New Yorlf's 
finest ... is Zionism the 
link between this girl's 
longings and the Holy 
Land? 



Class vice president; serv- 
ice squad, booster 





SURELLA ROSEMAN 



T^^\!3 



A sunny disposition and 
good looks make Surella s 
future success a certainty 
. . . her popularity with Dr. 
Beftran could be a direct 
result of (he candidness of 
her camera . . . remember: 
let not angelic looks de- 
ceive. . . . 

Elcnanet; class vice presi- 
dent; booster: librarian; 
seruice squad 

30 




SHEILA ROSEN 



rf^5oi>fc? 



njuni r\mn -n inj iqjn 
nn 

An artist whose heaven was 
Mrs. Levinson s class . . . 
Sheila interprets P.A.D. as 
plums, apples, and dough- 
nuts . . . claims the distinc- 
tion of having seen Prince 
Philip face to face~what s 
more, in the immediate vi- 
cinity of oiu' school. 

Aliya: Courier; class sec- 
retary; librarian; stage de- 
sign; art committees 




RONNI ROSENBERG 



ryp^n 



7Dm r\\}i)i nam 

Conducts her own class at 
8:45 on contact lens inser- 
tion . . . her love of water 
sports isn t the only reason 
green is her favorite color 
. . . her hrm convictions 
make Ronni suited for the 
profession of her choice. 



Class president; class sec- 
retary; stage design 




ANITA SALZ^4ANN 



r\in 



nnnnn nn R^mnn uuid 

The target of many a teach- 
er s enthusiasm . . . posses- 
sor of a circumscribed vo- 
cabulary . . . her doll-hke 
features and contagious 
laugh have brightened 
many a gloomy day . . . 
visiting hours are between 
3:43 and 4:33. 



Class secretary; class treas- 
urer ; cheerleader 




PAULA SAMUELS 



naw 



niDT] D''j^j3n Rini 

One of the few who truly 
regretted the newspaper 
strike ... a cold lab never 
daunted Paula^she built 
her own bonfire . . . when 
it comes to weekend spirit. 
Paula hits it right on the 
nose. 



Secretary, Aliya; class pres- 
ident; uolleyball team; serv- 
ice squad; Guild 




BARBARA 
SCHACHNOW 



Vt3*''13 



niju miDn un 

Can she really be as schol- 
arly as she appears in the 
Journal American? 
Schach finds Prophets a 
messy class. . . . No, Miss 
Backrack. that s only worth 
about twenty-one and a 
halt points. 



Service squad 




EVELYN SCHIFF 



mn 



un73 nnrjtu nnj 

Freckles add to her lov- 
ability . . . her spontaneous 
cheerfulness was badly 
shaken when she wound up 
with a "crew cut ' . . . her 
new community project: 
write along with Evelyn 
. . . we're just filling up 
space, you know how it is! 



y ice president, CO.; class 
president ; Courier; librarian 




BARBARA SHIMOFF 



nsna 



nm Tu loju nun nm 

That man's right hand . . . 
our very own chicken with- 
out a head . . . Barbara s 
not partial to any one class 
—she visits them all occa- 
sionally . . . not only presi- 
dent of our school, but also 
of many an H.C. 



Aliya; President, CO.; 
business manager. Courier; 
class treasurer; volleyball 
learn 



CHARLOTTE SILVER 



nT» 



naini dtpqj nnniN 

Charlotte has proved that 
silence is indeed golden . . . 
has a complexion of 
peaches and cream set oil 
by shining black hair , . . 
a teacher finds it hard to 
resist her disarming. But 
I didii t do nothing, 

Seri'ice squad; Guild 






ELLEN STERN 



HEDDA SILVER 



HTI 



R^T^ liuj^ innj qDD 

Will the real Chaya Silver 
please stand up? . . . Hedda 
had a hard time convincing 
one teacher of the existence 
of her invisible glasses . . . 
Proverbs XVIL "A friend 
lovelh at all times. " 



Courier; committees 



BEVERLY STEIN 



nîîa 



Bev s motto: have pocket- 
book will travel (or is it 
roll?) . . . not only a flashy 
dresser but also a flashy 
photographer . . . will Sey- 
mour graduate or will he 
stay around to scare next 
years class? 

Elchanet; service squad 



rnà 



What happened to Ellen's 
best subject? If the doctor 
were Kildare or Casey, it 
would be worth continuing, 
but . . . Mrs. Faerber has 
her hands full trying to dig 
up enough wars to amuse 
her. 



Librarian; dramatics; com- 
mitees 




DEBBY TELSNER 



SHEILA 

TENNENBAUM 




n-^nm 



Debby has an unusual af- 
finity for ceilings ... to 
quote her quoting, "I vant 
to see you. Telsnerrrr . . . 
an ardent Kennedy-o-phile 
. . . this girl never fails to 
find merit even in the worst 
of us. 



Class president ; class treas- 
urer 



n"»^ 



SIDA WEISS 



Or is it Tennen-boim? . . . 
Sheila is found to be the 
major topic of many a 
teacher s meeting . . . ath- 
letics and yahadus are right 
up her alley . . . "You crazy 
yearbook people are forever 
stealing my camera. 



Elchanel; committees 



HT^'on 



Sida certainly adds color to 
our school ... a rare prod- 
igy, she has managed to 
maintain a high average 
while goofing off . . . gave 
an appetizing effect to our 
Thanksgiving play . . . 
"Miss Adlerblum, you don't 
understand. 





Ally a; Courier; booster; 
librarian; service scluaa: 
dramatics: Guild 



nil 




GLORIA 
WIEDERKEHR 



^u^ri 



Gloria, will you please 
change seats witK Miss 
Wiederkehr . . . lier amaz- 
ing scholastic abihty can- 
not outdo her scientihc abil- 
ity as cleanup manager . . . 
we re sure she II be a suc- 
cessful Hebrew teacher . . . 
old standby, Gloria. 



GAIL WOLF 



nnw 



Self-proclaimed non-con- 
formist . . . walks between 
the raindrops . . . reduced 
to carrying her own books 
when her porters struck . . . 
math and science her fortes. 
Gail s heart is in the lab- 
oratory, so how can she 
possibly pay attention? 



SANDRA WOLF 



H'n 



Has a flair for writing off- 
beat pieces of rare beauty 
. . . English born, Sandy 
has crossed the Atlantic 
fifteen times to revisit her 
homeland . . . her ultimate 
goal is, of course, to reform 
the whole world. 



Aliya: Han 



r; lib, 



Couner Bulletu 
dramatics 



CO.: 



Aliya; manager, service 
squad; Hamvaser; librarian 






BESSY ZAUDERER 



^t)3?S 



Keeps us informed fashion- 
wise, music-wise, ana his- 
tory-wise . . . only her 
friends may call her Sylvia 
. . . our class actress. Bessy 
is constantly portraying a 
role: Brulus or Katasha or 
Captain Hook or . . . 



Service squad; CO. dra- 
matics 



36 



CAROLANNE 
ROTHHOLZ 



mn 



Till ]TR'] T^ 'nna 

Self-taught piano player 
. . . Hebraist of the highest 
order ... if our supply of 
jokes seems low. we need 



only ask Carolanne . . . she 
knows not only the com- 
poser of every musical piece 
written, but hums each on 
request. 



Service squad; musi< 



AUTOGRAPHS 



CLASS DIRECTORY 



ALramson. Tziona, 982 East 17g St., Bronx DA 8-7304 

Bencllieim, Judi. 101 Central Park West, New York SU 7-6114 

Bienstock, Barbara. 1175 Grant Ave., Bronx LU 8-8562 

Cohen. Paula, 1649 Nelson Ave.. Bronx TR 2-1094 

Cyperstein, Naomi, goo Bronx Park South, Bronx SE 3-7958 

Doppelt, Denise, 4go West End Ave, New York TR 7-1510 

Feuerstein. Joanne, 42 Beech Rd., Brookline, Mass LO 6-8558 

Francus, Roslyn, 508 East 26th St., Paterson, N, J AR 4-7341 

Freedman, An), 143 W. Beech St., Long Beach GE 1 -0068 

Friedman, Bunny, 141-47 71st Ave.. Flushing BO 3-8385 

Friedman, Leda, 141-36 73 Ave., Kew Garden Hills BO 3-1859 

Gallant, Barbara, 50 Ellwood St., New York LO 7-9375 

Glatstein, Grace, 824 East g6th St., Brooklyn RN 3-2227 

Goldschmidt, Florence, 113-23 84th Ave., Kew Grdns VI 6-1378 

Hess, Lea. 701 West 177 St.. New York LO 8-1154 

Hochberger. Judy. 495 West 186th St.. New York LO 8-2516 

Horowitz. Claire. 212 Sickles St., New York WI 2-5121 

Horqwitz. Sandy, 449g Hnry. Hudson Pky.. Riverdale KI 6-8413 

Jaroslawicz, Sarah, 585 Grand St., New York OR 4-4895 

Joseph, Sarah, 085 E. Tremont Ave., Bronx DA 8-gSo6 

Klughaupt. Avis, 30 Ellwood St.. New York LO 7-0855 

Knobel, Fraydie, ggo-J Grand St.. New York YU 2-5 ig2 

Kook, Susan, 24 Van Reipen Ave., Jersey City, N. J OL 5-6472 

Korn, Adele, 5333 DeKalb Ave., Bronx OL 3-4839 

Kosiner, Debby, 35 W. 90th St.. New York SC 4-5912 

Kriger, Sharon, 159-32 225th St., Laurelton LA 3-2325 

Kronegold, Blanche, 493 F.D.R. Drive. N. Y CA 8-5576 

Kupietzky, Channy, 144-45 68 Rd., Kew Grdn. Hills. BO 5-5305 

Kurz, Esther, 17 Ft. George Hill, N. Y LO 9-0382 

Landesman, Rivka, 609 Shaw Ave., McKeesport, Pa. ...OR 2-2951 
Levitt. Frances. 36 Parkview Terrace, Newark, N. J..,.WA 3-7170 



Lifshitz, Shulamith, 1310 Morris Ave., Bronx JE 8-3077 

Mayefsky, Deanne, 330-J Grand St.. N.Y CA 8-6422 

Maza, Cheryl. 18 Clark St.. South River, N. J CL 7-2947 

Meyrowitz, Shifra, 8718 Chevy Chase St.. Jamaica GL 4-0983 

Monderer. Ruthie. 118-14 83rd Ave.. Kew Gardens VI 9-2085 

Nathan, Bonnie, 69-52 178th St., Flushing, New York.OL 8-0356 

Nussbacher, Adele, 55 W. 82nd St., New York SC 4-2009 

Nulkis, Helene, 121 Wegman Pky., Jersey City. N.J... DE 5-8911 

Prager. Helen, 28 W. 174th St., Bronx CY 9-4759 

Reifman, Miri, 159-07 251st St., Laurelton, N. Y LA 7-5022 

Reisman, Gayle, 65-10 99th St., Forest Hills TW 7-8143 

Roseman, Surella, 1010 Sherman Ave., Bronx JE 7-6574 

Rosen, Sheila, 89 Shaw Ave., Newark, N. J WA 6-g8go 

Rosenberg, Ronjiie. 992 Allan Court, Teaneck, N. J, ...TE 7-6231 

Rothholz. Carol, 17 Ft. George Hill, N. Y LO g-64ig 

Salzmann, Anita, 84-54 126th St.. Kew Gardens VI 7-5565 

Samuels, Paula, 255 Ft. Washington Ave., N. Y WA 5-7889 

Schachnow, Barbara, 284 4th St., Jersey City, N. J OL 5-2655 

Schiff. Evelyn. 215 W. 88lh St.. New York TR 7-5658 

Shimoff, Barbara. 51-20 56th St.. Astoria, N.Y AS 8-1655 

Silver, Charlotte, 208 East Broadway, New York GR 5-1197 

Silver, Hedda, 144-41 6gth Road, Flushing BO 8-8281 

Stein. Beverly. 500-B Grand St., New York GR 3-1685 

Stern. Ellen. 20 Seaman Ave.. N.Y LO 9-1341 

Telsncr. Debby, 140 West 87th St., New York TR 5-3154 

Tennenbaum, Sheila, 350-J Grand St., New York AL 4-5870 

Weiss, Sida, 530-F Grand St., New York,', GR 3-0251 

Wiederkehr, Gloria, 1725 Davidson Ave., Bronx LU 7-0662 

Woll, Gail, 75--49 67th Drive, Middle Village, N.Y.„,TW 4-9501 

Wolf, Sandra, 420 Riverside Drive, New York MO 2-7556 

Zauderer, Bessy. 235 Ft. Washington Ave., N.Y WA 8-1331 





ULCER. 
DePT 



(^iciââ ^^rélâioru 



Class Biographer Deborah Kos 



Jreskman year 




We're off and running. ... We return 
to B. C. and Julius Caesar with Rabbi 
Dulitz. . . . Capish? Capish? "Just call 
me Eliezer," says Rabbi Paltiel. ... We 
are introduced to Albany via Mrs. Chry- 
stall. ... Mr. Steif is able to fly through 
the air with the greatest of ease. . . . 
We are initiated with surprise quizzes. 
... Mr. Klein pounds un, deux, trois 
into our heads and Debby has a crush 
on le professeur. ... Mr. Stepleman 
gains fame with his cats and un-cats. 
... Mr. Cohen is map-mad. . . . Boys 
enter our school for the very first time 
at the Purim Carnival. ... We do noth- 
ing on Lag Baomer. ... Mr. Lilker 
scares Algabra into us — how we trem- 
bled. . . . Mrs. Chrystall takes us on a 
tour of Roosevelt Hospital — it's a won- 
der they didn't keep any of us . . . 
maybe next time. . . . Snow sends us 
home early to wish for more. . . . The 
freshmen win the sing. . . . Rabbi 
Berenholz asks if anyone is able to 
tell him — thumbs down. . . . Rhea gets 
stuck in her locker. . . . Gum and the 
potential class of '63 have little in 
common. . . . Gail out-Presleys Presley. 
. . . Mr. Lilker has a boy . . . too small 
for us though. . . . 



We are invaded by Y. C. Q. . . . Albany is now 
crystallized in our minds. . . . Girls, if you con- 
tinue to chew gum, your kidneys will drop. . . . 
Those "Graven Images" of Miss Marks were very 
much alive. . . . Mrs. Feuer's clear enunciation 
leaves us with an eternal 000000 on our lips. . . . 
With all his enthusiasm. Rabbi Metzger should 
be a freedom rider. . . . Music class with Cantor 
Nulman. . . . Don't anyone cross the "L" In my 
name. . . . 0-So-Lo-Mio . . . real cool class. . . . 
Mr. Steif is still flying. . . . Shiomo Carlebach 
inspires a great following. . . . Mr. Edelman 
drives us hard. . . . Channy returns from Florida 
as if that made a difference. ... We meet Miss 




Rabinowitz and start watching her finger till, 
three years later, our search is rewarded. . . . 
Kennedy is elected President . . . cute, isn't he? 
. . . Sandra develops measles. ... Art class gives us 
the long-awaited opportunity to express ourselves. 
Mrs. Levinson is horrified. . . . The Mikado is a 
huge .success. ... We take our first Regents this 
year . . . plus two. ... At least we weren't fresh- 
men anymore. . . . Lag Baomer finds us in what 
appears to be a testing area. ... We examine a 
cow's heart in Biology and there is a large exodus 
to the bathroom. . . . Gym class has pyramids 
instead of girls. ... We reach the half-way mark! 



S 
Û 

p 

h 



m 



r 

e 

y 

e 
a 
r 



t 



//Ë 




H 

i 



r 



The Sweet Sixteen Year. . . . Mr. Klein charms 
us once again. ... As a turkey we enjoyed Sida 
very much. . . . IVlr. Steif was here just a second 
ago. ... "A Connie Francis I'm not." . . . Un- 
forgettable moments. . . . Miss lllig delights in 
her child prodigies. . . . "Will the girl who just 
got that dirty look please take a bath as soon as 
she gets home?" ... Se beated, Angel Cake. 
. . . You are in a state of utter confusion. . . . 
Come to this theater next week — Mrs. Faerber 
keeps us hopping. . . . Chemistry gives the girls 
food — for thought. . . . Who is Sylvia? Captain 



Hook. . . . Bunny is Peter Pan. . . . West Side 
Story is coed. ... A beetle intrudes upon the 
tranquility of English class and Dr. Friedenberg 
is the heroine. . . . Automation enters Y.U.H.S.: 
tuna, egg, hot chocolate and many calories. . . . 
Mr. Schwartzbard believes Honesty is the best 
policy. . . . But do we? . . . Our first class weekend 
and Paula and first victim . . . fun for all. . . . 
Mrs. Stern lives up to her name. . . . Either stay 
healthy or get an incomplete . . . problems. . . . 
How about that? . . . Our school's first graduation 
starts us dreaming. . . . 



y 

e 
a 
r 



We made it. . . . Visitors from Stern 
do not try to influence us in tPie least. 
. . . Mrs. Faerber continues to mark. 
... Mr. Pearl proves to be a man-of- 
the-world. . . . Wtiy shouldn't Barnard 
want me? My mother does. ... Dr. 
Lewin is amazed that the "A" class is 
so slow. . . . Mr. Siegel promises to 
cure us of our neurotic tendencies. 
... We nominate Mr. Steif for next 
U. S. astronaut. . . . Senior rings, keys, 
buttons, and bows. . . . Miss Rudoff 
refuses to let my people go. . . . Cow- 
boys in Jewish History? . . . Tests get 
longer and harder . . . when will it all 
end? . . . Never eat fruit at night — the 
life you save may be a worm's. . . . 
Miss lllig's prodigies turn into prodig- 
ious problems. . . . The case of Freed- 
man vs. Eliezri. . . . High School Bowl 
and we win — Girls are smarter than 
boys. . . . Naomi and Debby become 
fgashion models overnight. . . . Physics 
is in demand this year . . . wonder why. 
. . . JUDI DOES IT— what's there to 
say? . . . Profiles in courage — Ad- 
vanced Math students. . . . Where is 
Baylah? . . . Our second class week- 
end — Grace our second victim. . . . It's 
such fun pushing those little freshmen 
around "I was sick in bed." Admin- 
istration — "Then why didn't you answer 
the phone when we called you?" . . . 
an unfathomable mystery. ... In term 8 
we are painlessly jostled around — Re- 
sult: A's are mixed with B's as in the 
glass stomach on TV. . . . Happy 
landings to Mr. Steif and the class of 
'64 



Semor year 





46 



Yeshiva University High School for Girls of Manhattan 




in the heart of the city . . . 




f 
^ 



1^ 

4. i 

4 !'- 






llljlfillf "^^ 




. . . nurtures 




„««««-«*• 



the inquiring mind 





. concentration 




recreation 



. . . interest 



. . . relaxation 




m 





It 




. . . Future? 




m 




h 






ill 






To Stand Alone 



I stand at the edge of the cliff and gaze at the 
heaving waters so far below. The wind roars 
with fury as it lashes savagely at the already rest- 
less sea, whipping the huge waves into a seething 
foam. Thunderbirds, black and ominous, darken 
the murky depths to an inky hue. 

I gaze down and the dizzying height fills me 
with elation. From my towering perch 1 am out 
of the reach of those swirling waves, beyond the 
never-ceasing strife. Here the wind is a gentle 
breeze which rustles through the leaves and which 
gently caresses my cheek. And as I turn my face 
upward. I catch sight of the pure white shafts of 
sunlight hltering through the clouds piercing the 
darkness. 

Here, to this quiet cliH, 1 come in search of 
peace, peace from the problems which Life Hings 
in my path, peace from the turbulent sea of hu- 
manity which so frequently threatens to engull 



Here 1 come to be alone. Only here can I find 
release from the petty human hatreds which rage 
below. Only here can I find communion with 
G-d, with nature, and, above all, with myself. 
Here the air is not stagnant with prejudice, nor 
polluted by vile thoughts. It is fresh and clean 
and sparkling. And its freshness soothes my 
mind, clearing it of its garish images and bring- 
ing tnem into sharp focus. 

To this haunt high above the world I come 
again and again. I come to be alone. From this 
refuge in the sky 1 draw the strength to continue 
once more; the courage to return to the angry 
mob below and yet elude the net it casts out 
toward me: to adhere unflinchingly to my con- 
victions: to stand ftrmly — to stand alone! 



ROSLYN FRANCUS 




To Beat or Not to Beat 



Eventually, everyone reaches the point in life 
when he finds he feels impelled to let his fuzz 
grow, rent a pad in Greenwich Village, and let 
his inspiration unleash itself in the form of an 
Ode to a Shoelace. Generally, this whimsical 
fantasy doesn t materialize, although the dreamer 
is sometimes inclined to sneak a cup of espresso 
in memory of the vain ambition. Occasionally, 
however, the philosophy that. "We are but the 
blisters of dry paint and all the world is strained 
noodles, takes a hrm grasp of his soul, and he is 
not at peace with his deep, inner self until he is 
on the streetcorner painting a moving portrait ol 
his thumb. Thus, a member of the beat generation 
is born. 

Secretly, we may admire these daring young 
people for their ability to scoff at society, and in 
more subdued ways we try to imitate their indi- 
viduality. We are always looking for new ways to 
present an idea. The novel approach has be- 
come a most hackneyed term. We follow the 



latest fad blindly and then in frenzy tear our 
hair out and shout about the evils of conformity. 
Suddenly, we realize what a detestable trait fol- 
lowing the crowd is. and we look for an original 
angle from which to view life. Everyone is so 
an.xious to escape the square, square world that 
he rushes into the round, round world not notic- 
ing that everyone else is already there. In this 
way. the very urge to be different makes us — 
here comes that hated word — typical. 

This truth can have a frustrating effect on one s 
nerves. It has come to the point where I cry. 
Down with individualism! Be a conformist and 
like it!" Why not? These days, the only true 
way to be an individual is to uphold conformity. 
Get out there and buy the latest fad! Dont be 
ashamed of your old hoola hoop and yo-yo! Dis- 
jjlay them proudly and proclaim that you bought 
I hem because everyone else did. Remember -— 
never be the Rrst on your block to own anything 
. . . always be the last. 

CHARLOTTE SILVERMAN 




Shadows 



I, too, can rememLer iDeing afraid of shadows. I suppose all 
liltle children fear the shadows that appear on the walls and cur- 
tains of their rooms at night. It is their vivid imaginations that 
transform these dancing reflections into evil beings that they fear 
have come to do them harm. But they are only shadows, reflec- 
tions in the night. 

There is a shadow of darkness in that which is as yet untried, 
unfamiliar, and unexperienced. This is the intrigue found in a 
new venture. It is that which a little girl hopes to find in her 
mother s bag, the strange creatures a little boy expects to meet at 
the top of a hill, the intimate secrecies between husband and wife 
that the young wonder about, or the visions one has of a foreign 
land. Ail these are mysteries that are forever being revealed to us 
as we go on in life. 

The shadow of death looms out in the distance before us 
growing nearer as the years go by. This shadow constantly hovers 
about us quietly, serenely. It waits, as we wait, for the day when 
it will come to carry away our souls. We feel its presence and its 
inevitability, yet death, to us, is a world unknown and full of 
shadows. 

A busy metro|)olis suddenly becomes still, people scurry home 
and children leave the streets. The moon climbs slowly over the 
mountains and the sun casts its last rays to signify the end of 
another day. The evening shadows foretell night and sleep. 

As my shadow is an inseparable part of me, so is my con- 
science. I can escape from neither. My conscience is my inner 
shadow, always with me and following my every move. If 1 am 
good, my conscience praises me and if I am evil, it is as Satan at 
my heels. 

\Vc must learn to live with our shadows. 



56 



DEBORAH KOSINER 




m 



Mother 



CHERYL MAZA 



She is a strong being. She loves her young and 
seeks to protect iheni Irom the disturbing ele- 
ments around them. When one of her oHspring 
is wounded in any way. the mother feels as 
though her own heart is being wrenched from 
within her. She is a hghter, not easily provoked 
to anger, but ready to strike back when pushed 
too far. 

She is a pi'ovttier. She searches in the heat of 
day and (he stillness of night for food for her 
young, and when she rests it is an uneasy rest. 
For while one part of her is in slumber, the other 
— the greater part — is awake. She is listening for 
any sign of discomfort on the part of her young 
ones. 

But above all, she is a leader. She leads her 
offspring with dignity and courage through the 
hardships of life. The paths on which she leads 
them are those she herself has tried many times. 
Her battleship is sure and firm. She falters not 
until she has completed the raising of her young 
in the way she has pursued since they were born. 

This being is not a lioness; her home is not a 
fearful jungle. She is a Jewish mother leading 
her children through the hardships of life with 
never-faltering wisdom and persistence until she 
has succeeded in setting her young on the path 
of Torah and righteousness. 



;ër •>' 



IX~J 



The Jew as an Individual 



BARBARA SHIMOFF 



A man walks alone. The man is a Jew. Alone 
lie is an individual. Dictionaries might call this 
man an individual because he is a single entity, 
one of a class. I call this man an individual 
because he is indivisible. He is one, he is a 
whole, and he cannot be broken apart. As he 
walks alone in the existing world he must not 
allow himself to be broken; he must maintain his 
individuality. 

This man was created with a purpose. He 
was predestined to serve his Maker in a unique 
way. He was chosen to be a living testimony to 
a living G-d. G-d has kept him apart always 
and should he try in any way to assimilate, he 
will always be reminded — in ways often un- 
pleasant -^ of his individuality. 

The Jew who walks alone, his ears attuned 
to G-d s word, is fulfilling his individual respon- 
sibility. He has faith in a personal G-d who 
listens attentively to his prayers and with Whom 
he may commune at all times. He serves G-d as 



an individual, observes His commandments, 
studies His laws and follows His precepts. 

Why does each Jew serve G-d individually? 
Because His law has been directed to him per- 
sonally. His commandments read. Thou shalt 
not kill; Thou shalt not steal; Love thy neighbor 
as (fiyself. The sages develop the concept of the 
individual, saying that every man is a small world 
unto himself. He is a microcosm and the world is 
a macrocosm. Hence, he who sustains one Jew- 
ish soul, is like him who would have sustained 
the entire world. What better teaches the impor- 
tance of the singleness of the Jew? 

The Jew is Ramfaam; the Jew is Albert Ein- 
stein; the Jew is Henrietta Szolcl; the Jew is 
Yehuda Halevi; the Jew is Jonas Salk; the Jew 
is Reb Aaron Kotler. In all phases of life, wher- 
ever the Jew finds himself, he makes his mark on 
the sands of time as an individual. A Jew is an 
individual. 



What is Beauty? 



PHYLLIS NIAZA 



W/ia( is Beauty? 

Is it the greenness of a dancing blade of grass? 
Is it the bright glow of a star above? 
Is it the great lieight of a snowy mountain peak? 
Is beauty a soul in love? 

No. beauty is not that twinkling star; 

Too many I see — they form a shining sheet. 

And for each trembling, sharp, smooth blade of grass 

I tread a rug of green beneath my feet. 

Nor is beauty the mountain s peak up high. 
For many peaks I see against the blue. 
And though love is indeed a cherished jewel 
Many souls love with a love that s true. 

The sun is beautiful. 

It glows ^ and yet so does the shining star. 

It warms — but do not the rugs of green warm too? 

It's high above — but are not the mountains high? 

And what act does the sun that love can't do? 

Yet the sun is glorious above them all 
With a marvelous splendor all its own. 
I say the sun is beauty 
Because it stands alone! 



YAEL SIDON 



My waters billow and swell with passion. 
I am a whirlpool of anguished emotion. 
A maelstrom surging with furor and 
Burning with delirium, quelled by 
Nought but the Supreme Hand alone. 

I am the dulcet mumiuring of a silvery lake. 
The mellow moaning of a falling cascade. 
The quiet yearning of a lone river 
Whispering its dolor to the wind. 

I am the essence, the pulsations 

Of all life. I am the humble and the proud. 

The sufferer and the inffictor of pain. 

The crimson leaves of Autumn and the naked 

Branches of Winter, undressed by G-d of my duplicity. 

I am as a raindrop cleansed of sin; 
I am iniquity, duration and mortality 
Abiding forever, dying in an instant of Time. 

I am every pebble and every cloud 
Wrought by my creator, and because 
I am life. 1 must go on. 



59 




'^û)^^ ^4/^^^,.. 



The Dignity of Man 



WKen G-d first breathed a living soul 
into man and molded him in his own 
image, man was superior to all other 
forms of life on earth. Adam was a 
supreme being, and G-d had given him 
spiritual dignity ^- a quality which he 
alone possessed. 

After man had committed the first sin 
and was banished from the Garden of 
Eden, he became debased and filled with 
despair. G-d showed him the only means 
by which he could regain his dignify. 
Since that day, man has perpetually been 
striving for the dignity then lost, hoping 
in part to regain it. 

To achieve greatness, to be the first 
and the best, is the goal of man. Man s 
lifelong struggle for achievement has 
motivated him to employ his genius. To 
stand out alone in the minds of others, 
to be admired and held in awe is merely 



the by-product of his achievements. The 
true essence of dignity is man s respect 
for himself. To be able to search one's 
soul and realize accomplishment is the 
true criterion of self-respect. Without it, 
man is nothing. With it. he is the high- 
est and most worthwhile form of life. 

What is the proper course for man to 
follow? That which is correct in his 
eyes and in the eyes of his fellows. To ac- 
complish this, man must feel satisfied 
with his deeds and those who surround 
him must evaluate his deeds as worth- 
while. 

Man has the power to build worlds and 
the power to destroy them. The decision 
is his to make. The destiny of mankind 
lies in the hope that he will choose the 
path of life and follow in the footsteps 
of G-d forever. 

SHEILA ROSEN 



A FABLE FOR MODERNS 



Dignity of Man 



There was once a man named Man. He kept 
his brother's tiny dog, Dignity, which he loved 
very much. Of course, he was very rich in every- 
thing really important — money, properties ^- and 
his brother worked all day so that he wouldn't 
have to. He didn t have any children .— nasty, 
messy little creatures, aren t they?^ — so he pre- 
tended that Dignity was his child. He was neither 
nasty nor messy. 

This game of pretending that Dignity was 
really his amused him greatly, and he never did 
anything else. He never even bothered getting 
a dog of his own — his brother's dog would do. 
Not that Man was lazy — Heaven forbid! He 
simply didn t see why he couldn t exist perfectly 
well ori borrowed Dignity. 

But there s one thing Man hadn t considered. 
What if the rightful owner of Dignity should 
want to reclaim his dog? Shouldn t Man try to 
get a little Dignity of his own? 

SIDA WEISS 



L' Humanisme Chez Montaigne 



Le temps a un grand effet sur l'homme et sur ses pensées. 
A l'époque de Montaigne, tout effort de l'homme pour être 
considéré comme un individu avait été étouffé. Montaigne, 
dans ses essais, a essayé de montrer à sa société la méchanceté 
de ses actions. Il crie pour les droits de l'homme et dénonce 
la société. 

Nous pouvons comparer "Les Cannibales" et "L'Éduca- 
tion des Enfants " parce que tous les deux sont des essais 
critiques où l'auteur veut enseigner quelque chose de bon à ses 
lecteurs. Dans "Les Cannibales", il critique et se moque de 
la façon de vivre de son temps. Il nous montre par des 
comparaisons u'il y a des nuances d'humanisme chez les 
barbares et pas dans la scKÎété moderne. L'homme est con- 
sidéré comme un homme et pas comme une partie insignifiante 
d'une société chez les cannibales. 

Dans l'essai sur l'éducation des enfants, Montaigne ex- 
prime aussi le désir d'enseigner l'individualisme à tout le 
monde. On doit exprimer ses sentiments et pas ceux d'un 
autre, et de cette façon on va mener une vie plus humaine. Il 
nous compare aux animaux qui sont bénis par certaines 
inclinations naturelles à leur naissance, mais l'homme malgré 
cela, les déguise; ce qui résulte dans la perte de son indi- 
vidualisme. 

Qu'est-ce que c'est que l'humanisme ? C'est un moyen 
de traiter l'homme comme un être avec des sentiments, des 
pensées et une intelligence même s'il est l'échelon le plus 
bas de la société. Comme Montaigne dit dans son essai sur 
l'éducation, "On doit observer et apprendre de tous les 
hommes. De cette façon, on peut apprendre de nouvelles 
idées." Nous trouvons cette idée dans l'essai "Les Cannibales," 
où tout le monde est égal. Il trouve aussi qu'on doit donner 
l'opportnité aux enfants (à tout le monde) de penser et 



d'exprimer leurs sentiments et pas d'accepter les raisons et 
les principes d'un autre sans les comprendre, car on perdra 
son individualisme et n'existera plus. 

Montaigne nous indique l'échelle qui nous mènera au 
sommet. Il nous conseille de douter beaucoup et de ne pas ac- 
cepter tout. Il dit que si quelqu'un accepte quelque chose d'une 
autre personne parce qu'il est d'accord avec elle sur lui cette 
idée, il lui parait qu'il a créé cette idée lui-même. On doit 
admettre une erreur et cette admission est un acte de jugement 
et de sincérité. Il faut que l'homme se regarde critiquement 
et essaye de s'améliorer. 

Le monde est notre miroir. Les expériences des hommes 
qui ont vécu sont nos professeurs et nous enseignent comment 
il faut vivre. L'homme doit choisir les études qui l'aideront 
dans la vie, pas des études vaines qui ne sont pas pratiques. 
La philosophie forme le corps et l'esprit sains. 

On peut comprendre la révolution qu'ont créé ses paroles. 
Dans son époque les enfants ont accepté tout ce qu'on 
apprenait, sans critiquer, sans questionner. Aujourd-hui trois 
cent années après sa mort, nous nous servons de ses théroies. 

Il nous fait vouloir juger, poser des questions et nous 
révolter contre les choses dont nous n'acceptons pas la raison 
d'être. Par ses mots, ses conseils dâ choisir une façon de 
vivre, dà questionner, il a préparé le chemin â l'humanisme. 
Dans ses deux essais critiques, il exprime beaucoup de qualités 
mais, malgré cela, chaque individu ne peut pas se considérer 
comme très important. "L'Éducation des Enfants" nous en- 
seigne comment créer l'individualisme, et dans "Les Canni- 
bales" il critique notre société de toutes ses forces en déplorant 
notre manque d'individualisme naturel. Nous devons le bénir 
pour ses efforts humanistes. 

NAOMI CYPERSTEIN 



62 



M'l'i',]! ^31a^7 n'3-i n: nnpssi 

«■"SO "I? rsMS rr^; inir im .absc 
sstt'K *;i;na -i"ifli3'»'7r! mro .u'tn nr -iniT 
."'sss'? ssitt nysir ns^Bin irjan Tiys 

.T'sa nrr»» — yis sï -i^sn — ■'3« tt 



65 



v-3X> nn>w n'vi "^^^ ™"'= "" 



T?£D*iûi: n^nn 




]iîsï nriDS nsD 

.n:iaN3 nins 'Dnss npoy n"n Vsi nyo'?! 
.-■'S'''?i3 'piyaii'Dn n^'on nnsiz'an D':!:; 74-d ■>iîh m'7i: .Tna 
■jDN'on nawnn rr'siîi': nns'? .nnnn mxns'? nmn ay in'a nyin in 'r'jn 
nmu'? nrniayn 75:0 n'riys nt3iz;a iroj n'? hii/dt dk; •iiDJj-'E'n nrian 
.myisn ':'7ja -'ona iu'?a:i:' D''D''7Dn 
'7)inv' r^^o nnva 'Jii'? .'n-iTan ■'m ns inx'? nn-''7sn 1925 nwj 
nnoian nim ins viw nipoa': ny^sm ii:nn 3sa hk anpa m'sn 
HTO '7'i' nnaiT''? nmn .rryispa miz^sn'? mpiptn nny:'? □••inra 
D'TDna 'jsni:''' I'nsa ic'? laxs Vy npnasa 'n-iia '»: I'rap i'jdddu 
nil Di'7i:'iT'n 'mia niTyx rra n:n: m '?yDa'7 nsxiriD .'yixpa lunV 
n'7iyD iinii'n yaiynsan 'mia rm'srs n'a n:n:i i'?in nys .n'as 'rnn 
Dnsa ia-ini n':D'73n "nn u'rntt'n mT>yx ■'d'js .m:pn M^Ia ■>!:;: ay 
m'isa n'7K rrnoian onV wz-^vj yispa'? nmn m'pian r:^'? Q:ni:'3ai 

.riTn 
mioan nrmnyn iin^n nNtannn □■'i'?'''? ^'7DDD^J rrnn '?!:' nnnnK 
.riKwn nsiprai ,T':a-iJ3 iio'?!:'': ,ii'"a-' .i'td'h '?i:? irT''7y latn □:ya'?- 
nxn 'nm '733 dv'i'? n''n3 n-iTy ,nsiT'xa D''t3'''?D '3ian '71:' Qn'''7y -snvh 
.□'sxj.T mj3np .u-'ib-''? nnsnai D'ain' 'ns 
-|D3 T'23'7 n'':3n nj'sn x'- .nT3 -pDnon n't 7'7DDt:n rT'n3 q'71k 
m''nN3i min: n3''3D3 □'jv^i D"n nrn'? lyun n'''?y n'r''? -hi'dn''u; n-'ib-' 
r\n^ '7y x-ip:n n::yn3 n-'i'?^ ns3i nn'7sn3 nnsin n^xasa .iT'nnDi:'a 

.□'■iii/wa on'?'' 'D'jxa nam 
□n"? nmoan n^'^am dn n'?DDUiJ n-'n33 ixn D-'ain-' an'?' ':ian 

.©SJI 3'?3 

ni'a iTyiV n'?DDUii n'n3 moann '?Knu''' n^na naipn ins'? 
-ins'7 m'7ia3 riN'"" ms^^ yn-isa ix3pnnï; D'mn bv.-)^-< ■'D3E7 .nT'i'?^ 
iya'7 TOsa nmpi'? .nnyi'? ,rn nviP' rnsiDn3 -ni''D '7Ï7 r^w □"d'js 
nx-i3n •'n3i d'jw nnsna ms-''? miy ni di:?? tins inx oy'? dii:' rn' 

.rrnyn '73 ■'i7'''7 Dn'7' '^s dji 
.3"3i:7n 713^^3 muD: n'^soun n-'n3 
: n'7N □■''7a3 n^m-i3na nnx m^na rr-jra 3-in nnriys 'ip nx 
mioa .niN'sai pm ,pai ni^'-ny : n'7''5T 'n'73 ma'7i:'3 i3'7ntt'n nTii:i3n3,/ 

."D'l^'nn n'7iyD '3^^^ np'ny 



n^mîJiiT y^axni n^ajn» Tii^n ninn 




i'!^^j^ '^^^Nite</'i'., 



•'awn T'ai .'iinvi ay- mriî: ."nt^" ynx m Trp- Nuann rin'?iyD3i nm-'ï;''»: 
..T'n HK -nnp- Dn'7xn ly?:'? -i2;n mxisna 'rsiE^'' 

ni'ûsn nasi ,nn;jinn nswi d'i'?'''? d'hsd nana .vit nDio ,1:^:0 n'?a ^^■^ 
.nrnyï nii/m ï'd: nVya n.n'n n:n nKii? nain n'pd' x'? .nnn m'j'SNs 
'?'i'2 nsawin nns nys .mann miyï: minai n:^DXQ m'a'rn nn'n n:n 
.□'ii.T'n '?w DmPia .psiii" fixp mby'? lyu nsiap oy in'a rra'''7n- tni .nnnir 
.nmina x'n D'ass: □■'jaa nvnb i'?dv di:' -«a u'an -ïiapn •'22 
.n'i^a nan .mya na rrasii; nnx"? .nas'? nnxn mp'n ii'D:n nnrna 

.n:na iis,-'? nan'? n'n ni2;p 
nsiap oy nin r^rbsn ,nnn r'îNai n'maa-naa mjiaa in D'':E?a nan 

.'?Nnc'| yin 'Din '7n udn'-iu '72^12 Qisi'rn 
Viapa n:n nai:;'nn .'^■''ria nii-K '7'?n:a nny:'? nson rra nx na"Da 
nn'naa na'rnîi'n K^^ m2;n miayai on namsai -nno'p t '?y ,"D' nnu;» 
myirai -n'as '71:7 □"nnson rmanii'aa nii^T v^io n:n .□■'■'si'?nn D"nn msa 
.d'x'tdj m'ï; ^13 la rnc lov nana K'n ■'s:Dn 
oViyn nnn'ja ns-iDu^ nns'? □'rix .ni^'py my^a nyiT -:n nn-'n rispa 
n:n .nm:a nV in: x'? ,Di:;smaa n'riy nxn '7Tji .nsn's ■'mn' '7iu ,n'':i:^n 
lax mmi '"'xa rfxi'rnn n'7iyDn nijoaa mn'n □y'? nnanna npsnon nb 
D'Wiin nu '7iJ-ia poy'? i:aix nii^x 'unan xasn t- '?y mnay mn'ra'? qncsn'? 
.rr-oran ii^dw n'?ya minan .nan^x min' n'?sn îya'r rmiyaxn man '?yD'? isi 
.inva av 'la n'?an ni'?iyDa □•'ansa D'aïax may ,m'?t:'m m'?tyn mmir 
a'ixn 'ip'j naya D'inx n'an^na naa niyi x'n nn:sin na lar nnx'? 
'T '?y nttîsn: am Dcsnia mrx'? □■'ji^LnD mjya n::nDn ni^'a .n''a'?Di5T'a 
visbv; nyn'7 n^a nai: na'7i:'in dit'? niyx nmoxn n'-a ipaa .'jansn a^ixn 
.D-'E'P D"i:ya nnuifpy nx lan'? c'rnn xim .'r'-nn ni^a nxxT mina nas: 
x'7 iii'x nas Dy naoa mpT l^'o'? n:n nx iï;''3Dn ^x □"jaun D''-itniz;n 
Q'avx nm iiaon xna Dxn nx ix'ra on ^a nnx .nnnx □':t:' ni nmx nnxn 
mn'i'jii'n nx nax'? m^aon nin .D'-unan nmo nx n'rin x'? n:n nx ma'? nn'?ir'? 
■'jsa naya pnnn'? DTU'n iD'''?nn ,D"mn anny Tm ,ni:;Dn3 n'?'?Aai:' naitynn 

.D'ûsi^n 
naixa mjiai n'Dna n'?i-iaa ma'? n:n:i 'xas usii^aa maaa may n:n 
mira mn'? nxsm p'n 'la-un iit:'7U'n nxa n:'':n a-pa'? nana x'n .nnj:inn 
.nn3:in'? D'onn niy'ra •'isb nsp tar ,1944 
naoa n'7'?iia iai -m'oxa ©:d n:n nana ntyx jar xsa: x'?an n^aa 
mxm p'ji:© in-ain nirx» nnai r'iwn oyn a'7a nau^n mnar x'?tt' n-naj 

nyi:'? p-jco'? '.asn "maa'? 



67 



J^^^'Sf" fT'5„> i:!3Kn 



na 



nTiin'tt' .mp-ip'7 it'iw mtt? mnn 1915 r\W2 
nn27 .n di:>i m^iy t-sh m^n 'JDn mjiE'K-in 
.myaii^n n'? 'jk piay d''d:dj n'?- la □■■Ksrn d'otodh 
iiD'n ns nn^'jai mnny nny: rmns mnsa N'n 
.n'?7.ii nD'?in -t ^inn rrmn-'!:' nys^'n .rrm nnso'? 

130 7)^3 iT'jtt' mi:' nnniD T'73a 'mn nason^ 
.TTiinj '?D nx r-jnpa n.nyai nn'a'rn 25''? jop 
p 'IS? Tni:; D'E'jn ims .minn mna nunn ^^:^^ 
iTpsn .p'mDu'? i:;in'7n njpnn ns nn'i mTpsa 
.in-m:3 na^jV m^bp. n:pnn ns nnva nn'-a 
nnK noi:;Dnn ni lup nso nn '71:' ii^nn jT':3n 
I'm 13 nns n333 mpnpi .mni:/ mriaa -ixp pi 
■rii' iDon ^n3 no'-i7 rma ™'?nii7n in mpa .'piS 
."npy n'D,/ m5n:n 
mi:; bm nuy nsa "5nni:'n n^is bs mai:?na„ 

.nyunn '?!:' lunn 'nnn nxnp nan •i!:'ai:' m'ii:? 
S'n .D'''7i'?n ns -ni:;y -\-)''m mi:; '71:' nmiay 
,nma ^nbn. ,ni:n nnoia msa "71:; d^-\ mn.i'? nnsr 
.rm'a'7n nnam 
mi:; nn'?n O'di" nTiinaa ri'7va'? miny -may 

.■-n u;ny '?57 n'7s:i mns -\-i->w 
ins'7 .i:;ip PiT^i; myn ,n"x-in ,nN3 t'd av2 
.T^m•^p2^ mnoa nnaiy: nss' ,r\2^ rm: ^p■''7^^l:; 
mnn'?: rm'a'jn irj'? nin'?^ np'''?7n s'ni:; nn:n 
•]iiT] nx nn'sa ,n"n 'pysa ns iD''i:;ani:' nuas:! 
.'tnii:;'' mji'? 



mnn ,nt:ii:'Di -y',:s ni:»» nn'n i-fw mE» 
nsT s'?a n'n D'ann naV .i:np tysi u/d: niT-oa 
nms iDsn n'rs n'lp .mna'? Q''?nj D'ami D'air 
m:a'7 ]\:ipT] nson n'-a .nmpa «lo'i:' n'jya nawa'? 
n:s las n'n avP^ 1915 nji^a nnns m':i:7 miy» 
."apy rra,/ nyi^n .mssinn nana n'a'?iyiT nj?i:n'? 
'Ton nnDi:'a'7 naa T'ain n:i:;a mVi: mi:; 
,nma rrnaV nnn'?'' nmrn nn'n nb-'),-\ .aipipa i'?3 
ns ntynn Tan abm .onon rn^'a:»'?! .myri"? 
m'?'?iannn naa .na'aom n^aa m'lsn pai:; nysn 
aiirn'? n'j'nnn m'vsn ma; .njn:n anpa mai:; nni:;? 
.asan ppnV n^am by 
nny'? mty nx'?s: on^'oa^a m' nmni:' imb 
- n'?iN -rnsina maiy nn^i nva .n^an nonsa nn'? 
nsoa ivy na nm nasya mm mai'? nn''- o'-anya 
.i:;''i^Ka Dum oy "Vnii:;''? pin„ 
mi:? n'js'-'rini .-jii:;Min n'a'jiyn nan'7an pia 
nsaiDi:; aima nD:an n^aa nawsin mipaai nri'? 
nsn ann .i:7'?d yn ann ni:;ina isa ly nai:'-inn 
na'7'7 D'i!;ri nx miyi miain nmn' ^71:; nmai nx 
n'?y mi:; V-;:; na'ja .mp ■'a'-ai:; '?sie7' 'i:;^ mmisa 
.p'maN rn 'ai i" ■'a aipip mn'? Tain'? irynn m 




ryiv^^ *]ib *jnm n)3n> x^^n ;pm?a?fl 



D"n nn'a '^m rr-xni n^n vn ms'^an 

nyo n":y nanm nam T-n npix mrs 
ma'u^'a naan di km .ninViiy "75? ot dt 
,nT'o:3 'nn nnm n^'oan 'T'a'?nai 
in n:nn nra''? ijjy n'?Kn ni'riysn '732 

.(HD'?») nrn nna Vi:; n'?sa k^e»: lor 
mtyn .n'xnj n:n n::iDnn ,t>ki'' iion 
nxa '?nj 'aiN'? 'jysa'? .«lov pi n:nn 
riK m'ann ^u'jTOn riKa n'^ap km: .'jkii:''' 
.r^Pi ^lio n:anj idi' im nna'aoi nnat: 
a'aoa nam napin D'aiyn nniann nna'? 
mixan nnao nriM n^iann 's'? .nnau'? 
laii^Ti'iy nnK'7 n'-KKiïj? nrio nvn'? m'ny 
nran n'xni n^n .'jjionsi inso ''rii na 
15? natt''? nmp lai:^ dmu» ira nnaua n'? 

iTxiJ n:n nna ma:(u;:n n''m'7iyD osya 
nai'7nï3 '730 nnau aity tro:! ,i569 n:i:?a 
nna'? .numm k'? hkVdm n'jann .ni^p 
.HT 'rysaa T'i:'i:nE' k'ï;: Idt ]m bv; vsoKa 
nys m-iijr rr-x-ij n:n '71:' nnia '75? nyiM 
.n'7ijn mxisn ^aai '7Knir'' viKa na '73x1 



K'n .n^xij nm '71:' nai'7n □ii';»n: 1553-a 
•fjivn ]u'?wn .nnxin nsn'N nK naiy 
D'DUN nixa li'an .mnrz: n:iDD nmiin^ 
in^a lyjn □■''7n5n nvoya nTnii/a vhe^ 
niDQ riK Dn-''7y!: n'on □'71a .NDi^ii7'7 nriK 
.•'i'?Aa nnrr''? mm nnsw 
TnyE? d''di:k'7 nKi'7 na'iran n'xn: n:n 
invaa KM naiwn .nnsin mxnNa ikïqj 
,nPip3Ka ms'Tin lara I'nan nai nn^iyo 
,'S'3-in '71KD .nvD'SKn n:n!3a '7a:n T'y 
■73 riK DKriD nDK'7 mx .•'xap ivd'sk 
n'xij n:n '71:? nm'7inii'n'7 nnM .D''DUKn 
DK TO inntt''7 nvDiDsno ■ia'?wn ii;-n 
nvs'SKn .D'anin d'^ti: vn ni:?» o-'ouKn 
Q'DliKn ^K1I' D'71K .11 Htt'm K'7a'7 r'7K: 
^^n nyaiKi dme^s -mtt^p nnna una 
nca D'yn^ d,t .1556 nwi D"n isni:;: 
-^x-|j n:n "71^ nnycttMa ."-Jip^xa D'liJnpn» 
.D'k'7s tt Tyn -inoai '7a:n '7y mn nam 
.n'anna n'laia nrur'K nn'n n'sij n:n 
jn:a du? ninji nin: ]iaiKa naaii^ K'n 
Mi^ ny nn'anan DMwpn nna^ .D'a^o: 
nxn ny D'-anpn d^ohm nna'71 n:nan 




g/Pi^&feS^ 






.."imô nT'axa ^n^n 




■juj 103 niDD n^n n-'r^v; ■'^^■ann '?-i? novn 

nmn □'7ix .p-mu3X3 nnDU^Qn idd: nx □nnn'? nsn oi:a n'a'? 

.-ina-'m^ ni'jsn s'? niana nT'i'77ni^m n's:! n'?2;aa l'n'?'? 
nin .n'ï^u dj n''sn:i n:n 'jtt^ n"n ns ma minn nns 
no: ,m2a ri'aV ids nann n^n rrn Kin ixiy riDns l'ra ,':iy,T 
n^nirr «•'n m:a n'xnjw n:Kinn nsnxn pwn 't':d nx onnn'? 
Vi'73'7 iK n::iDnn rT's:i3 np'^niD-in nsyia i'j'dk ,rii:'snna 
.□van n'xnj n:n 'rii' nuriDT nx 
lu'jwn '?!:' ixnn 'ïyr av oiia nnsiya na'p'? nmn 
D'i^'iva n'Diin nmynn pan ,n2;a xsnn ay iwm NOï'ip^ 
nsjna nnur-in inysu'nm rr-sii'? nnva nnjtt' n'?ii' îo'ricn .nVx 
D'Dmnni:; nnx .'[••)3m:> oiiù n^n rn njj x'sin'? np^'^niDin 

.Dija n'3'7 lain nx 'jtz/n ■'-i:n di a'jii? nvnDnx nv:x nsy 
nnu;'' ni2?i mis'? n'su n:n may mnna mxpriDnn nnx 

.1552 ly 1550 mtya 
.VjiuniDi -D'Duxn nnito'? nnn n'sij n:n n'jys mnoa 
.naina TyV ix rca-iin'? dii^idt ny in^a may'? on'? mty x'n 
■'i'?3a '?iyD'? it T-ya n'?D'' a-'iin-''? ion hd: mis '?unai:' iT>aa 
.□'aityn nnso nxxina naam nxj nnwa 
n-'xnj n:n .Q2?a D^ouxn w-\-\^ misa nDia nsns iii'xa 

•liTaai noaa nn'iïa nu'Do omun nwi'? m^ayn 






mnra a'? nawn'? n'iKi m'?ijin D''i:;:n mma 
.nonra nnsira y-ira ,x''ti':-Di:a n'xij n:n n:n 
nmi vaxa .rrriiax m'? nmToaa n:"uxn rrxni n:n 
.•''?a'?am ••vim nu^2 '?''n nniz'y dji na'? maniai 
.xiD'x ,x'?D m ri< -nay ■':a'? ija'? nn\T x^n rr-a' '?d 
^^aD nxina n^siy nin nxipi nnDii?n nnipaï; 

."ni'Dyan nTiajn-/ 
HTnax .'?JiDniDa .1510 r\w2 rn'?i: rrsn; n:n 
n:iaxn nbm '?y nai:;'? nxnia ly^ï; d'dux rn 
ipc^ïjns Dy T'iiVL-i nnaa ûojdj n"' naa .naan x'?^ 
ni D-iD'aD 1'? rni:' ,n2iaD'''?a '?ni p:a '?ya Di:a 
m:n20 n'?ya nrrn n'sni nin .i:'?im riDisa 
n'?ya ny in^a _n'?n2 km .'?'?3n la D'xxr □"u^ya 
niT-a ni:;yi nai nn'?sna □''?ni D"xp:a nvov 
.D'aisy nnaa'? yi,T 
nvya'r ny Tan rrn na'? D'Taan nvoy nna'? 
D'Diixn D■'^1^^^ is'?x: nau; nii'pn nsipna nay 
D'oiix nain'? miy x'n .mis: '711' moa nnn nrn'? 
n'-xn^iprxn 'ncsa pannn"?! nnnx msnx'? niay'? 
,njiaa '?y non x'? n^sni n:n .Qn''7y na^xa nn'ni:' 
D'yxaxn '?d nx nniu'-i'? m^aym 'an'? □^■■'71:' nn'?i:? 
■jy ysii/n'? i'?7ni:?n n'n''?!:? .n'î^mn □"Doan 
n'?''yin n nn'7iyD .nMW miu '?i:a''ir nvs'Dxn 
.nsp lai'? 'a nx .na'ioa maa 
n'sni n:n np'nyn 1536 npa n'^ya ma inx'? 
inT Diya may'? n:a '7y pnimix'? nat:'ia nx 
mm''? mm'? n'oiixn i'?3' Qw mpa .n'pnin'? n''?D''X 
n'snj n:n nym d'u'p im '''?it:'?t: nux'? .■'i'?ia 

.n's:i'? 1544 n:i:;a 



n>3Dn!3 nn^a n'^a 



nnnD 



iJi's flisVit? nsr: 



npannn nnnn .r:a diVe''? bti^ m'a'? Tsa 
nnK'?i n'jinn did ^b nu^'in x'n .mnn nnityna 
■73x2; nnx'? .in'7 ns lyo'i:; uaa niypa 'j'lnni:' 
ru;3Si inpD ''r in: inK din .'m» : n'?NE? imx n'7Na- 
"?inpDn ns T'lnn'? ''ry nxn .•'T'^ ims •i'm'? xa 
'?'73i '7'73 n'jNE''? Qipsi iND T'Xtt' T-Nsi 'ai h'? n:y 
m .vVyn'? inpsn nx T'lnn'? .T'jyi:; v'tku piai 
■jya ino^ 1T< ii'?o^i T'n'? n'jya nx rr-ma nn'ryn 
n^na n'mia r^a '':ii' nx Txa n nxiEJa .rrja 
N'?n» : i'? max nyiL' nmxa .na ••aaa -ns nua- ''y 
in3 '7» — "Ti'?va'? inps Ttnn'? inxi:' 'jrna'? i: 
.(x"3 'X arx) "imaa a niy 'iT np'? m 
piDD'j •ii:'pa 'Vtya ii^maa xaia nrn -nDon 

.(S"'? '"'ru/a) ."sxa-' 'a V'n ntyx,/ 
pn sVi pmn p xrm 'i '71:' inaa pn x'? 
m'ï/'xn nTn'7ya mata dj x'7X Txa n W iniyxa 
.riDia'? '^■'n n^îx '?u; n^-np mai nnna mna 



■■Da naxiii' minn 'ii^nm Q'-iaxan on Q'nn: 
pa .T'Din'? la'? 'xia ma'jna oii'in'? lati ni^x 
nii'x ,nnna nx ,'7X^ll"a n'rnn'?! qe''? laiii; wmr] 
xTi .mnpsi ,nina'? ,a'aï; nxT- o'sps^a nnai 
'Ann r\-\wv»ii .viin p x:':n n '72? ina rnrn 
D''aan 'ry Txni:; .Txa n '71:' ini^xi ,"mD'7a 

.naSia 
□■■xann ■•'7171 naia a'yaE'j iti nnna nai 
maVn mxa E'^E'a nxva nn^ni:' rr^y Tya pnv 't 
di:e? b;'7E' iii^aa nv '7aa D'aan mxa i:?'7E'a ma'7i:r 
.(a"D DinDa) 
PDiD '-I r^ nD'7-a np'7naa nynan nnx ays 
nD\, : lax yirw 'i ':s? nax: nnai&'a .n^aanni 
.(X"D a"a D'''7a xnsmn) "-'-ma max 
nmx D^aan oya i'7xiy na'ioa na^n ]':ya 
mu^y^a xin d:) xaa p mirr '1 yaE'ii'D .rrnx nxi 
ina max hd'» : nax .nri'iai nx ("ma'7a 'jnn 
T'D p"a a-''7a 'Din) "i:aa oi'Tin ]i xr:n n '72^) 

.(I"' 
n b^ innaE^a nnj vnu; .a-'yc^-inii; naioa 
'7'7Dnn n^xa ni:' na na ny imx anysa vn .I'xa 
Hb ; inu;x nnna i'? max .QTair't:; uaa E'pai n'? 
nxn ia D'-xcn lanv/ dx •'a "D'-xuin ian\/ raina 
n2ia .(n""7 T'p o'Vnn) "nrx ny a^s^-\i (nxiap 'c) 
x"? K'7''aai nsn p ni:iisn lan^i:; nxi:a piDsn 
on^'y □'am .xid'x .wpa'7 w' .D'?iya D'yin im' 
'7ipa yaiy Txa n .□'yz'T ttt" xi'i nairna Minw 
.naia^na ntm D•'y^n I'jai:' '7y n'am typa .inii'x 
■'w ma iwxa nnna nnxnn m'7y: m:iDn 
rrm E^nian n'aa ac Txa 'nu; nya-a oxna n'p 
Dn':i:^ nn'in nmia .nau;a nn:a pia de? E'nn 



^a^mîaK i^Kria 



nmym dim ly 12'? ni»;: ,'7Ni2'''a qni nK''33 

.1'? mipn 'jsVi 
□'KS1Î3 mimi D'-i^a '71:' irrriT'i:' ^y idi: 
n'7'7Dnnti' ns'?D3 nsnn n'7Dn pns T'ina ijn 
n:n ns n'?'ii'n isi^a'? ns^an itt^Ka n:n 
.N'33n '7S1!:!:;d i:'? ynM 
nrjra •'ni:; .inva 1123'? idt D'i:': ■'nu' 

.nnoxi nn □■•^n di:; '7y iNip: 

n'? ns3 nman 'ay: ns nnry Kb nn 

.'"'P'jN Tp'?ï<'i '^y l^V" D'^ii' 2'?3 n'7 moKi 

nn 'nx ••ij''' HM II n'jpiï mrj V::; nisa 

naw Knpjv : rrn Dii^n ns V'tn onsna idi 

n"3pn'7 invni:» m nwa nx^i nnDiii' mi 

.('T mD-i3) "nin^ttîm m-i'E^n 

nnoN ■?!:' nnT'i:"!<'? nyii: mn-' m3''ii'n 

nmrrri "73 nx iidn'? 'Dints'? nmsï? 

n'7 niry'? a-'aiy ^am my'? nD m:ynn'7i 

s'? nD'7an inox .ayn nmu'? nmn-''7ii'n 

njDon nyii'a nii^s: nx pi '7''sn'? n^^pn 

'ayi •'n'?siy3 iiyDi» liab max x'n .i:ay'7 

.'7xni:?'' '7'7D ny nnmim "'nwpaa 

n''nn\T iina nay x'?» Dnisn ■'a^tt' dvj:> 

(n"D '■" nnox n'?JB) "Q'?iy'? nie x'? nisn 

Di'? ntt'pn nx:'? idî' nnox '7ï; nav 13 

.m'^n iiCTtyn 

x'7X i:'? rxi '?''n wv ni:3 m^n ]dx 

•inTiinpyn na'?'? 



"nnn mD-''?n n'Dis^n x\n nnM pnx' T)} ins 12^x2 

.D-''7nxn niz?!' :ip)}'''7 nsinn nin'J n'7 rmirn 
mnyan n'':am dx3 nyn n"?! nnnn bn-\ '?w nman 
'm yw:/: nain '7ip-/ : x'njn nnns n-':3 '7y n 'am nx 
.(T" X"'? m'aT-) "□n:n'? n:xa n^n '7y noaa 'rm onnan 'sa 
ii^nian p nxE»n l'a i:x ona'? nx'? '?w Q'nmn n'i^^ya '7y 
('S u"3 n'tt^xnn) "nmnxn '?m xjpm» pins'? •'"ti'nn xman 
.(nx'? '711') "D'Hion n'E'yaa ('?m) nx^p,, 
D'w:n '71:' nDnxn n'7i:''7i:'3 n:n:;xT n'''7in p mnaxn 
.i:ay nmpa n'?xn D'i^jn '7^ îp'?n '?nj .i":n3 nv^pnxn 
i'7Xi: nnn imxa vnc' nripix n'i^: nsï^n» '?"Tn nax 
.(N'" ntîiD) ."Dnsaa irmnx 
nns'? .nyiDi msï; nn'7'an i:"Dxn nnyi:rn noipna 
,(a"3 'X maty) "iniD''7i:?n mix'n m'?''n pn '73,, nn nynsiy 
.(?"■' 'X maii^) "□17'7'n nx nr^nm» idd3 ^wB2 nx nn'?''an lau; 
nyiDi ,i:3n niifa '71:' lax ,7331'' x'n mai:; .tfinan 'd'? 
,nixM nD^ '?y may nii/x □na'? nmn .ininx ona xm 
nx nyns n3 n:-'ain ,n3''n3 n'71:^ n'7M nx r^nm n33T'i:? nnx'? 
.npi'a i'? nrn'? ni:;a ax 
D''na3 nnix nT'3ia nmnni i:?npn mnV nn3T dj nna 
max anal Q''ii':x'7 m'ii» nu'a nax en n-i'E^a .nx''3:n 

.a'if:'? m'ï' 
'ai '73 n3ia3 '?xntt?'''? D'à nx3 nn'n n'a bin nm3i3 

.n"n 
p-iDb nn3T n'i3Diu;n nDipn3 nx''33n mi3i ns 13 D''na3 
3'ixn m nnxs3 3'? rax nnx-in x'n dj .i:ay nmp3 x'?di 
.7inï:n □V3 nnwi m'ir ma? x'n dji 
ptt'a'? m'7'nD ni:7iy ,ii?man 's'? ,nn'n nx''3:n mi37 
imx3 nsioai ."niTs'? nc'K» 01^3 nxnp: p'7i n'?'ii'3ii' 
n3nx 'ix IX .mx mann'? n:i3n: nx ; 'n n'? nax./ : tt'man 






hl3TÎ3 






uaï rm'?inn D'?nna 'jxityn nîi'Nn "71:? ni:»nn maya 
tnpyn '?apnn niwx'? on^a .nny ira' lyi iminnn n'^^xna 
nn'ri jran mp5? ■?'" ns/N iinai "na'jD i'?a nn mi33 "jS// 
.n'^m-in oniaT nixym n'lnn ii^nn ynsan oiun T-an 
n"nn ri-\T\^'7 211^: 'ran Tan '7xni:^''i DTinn rn nii's'? nmn 
□sriD'? id'dV isn "mil's ii wa» "j'tn nasa .□"nnsii'an 

.□yn 'Da tji:' 
D"nn '?y oi msiDn DTiy'? nysi^n '7N-iB;-'a rri'sn d'71s 
□'aTOn mviiNan n^iDia may D'ays'? 7\m^n ^b■>sv^ n'mnxn 

.i:ay nmpa 
maoiisa D^m '71:; nnns nriaT nsn'? iSi'? 'nm:;: 
^TDai yinirn'7a nynTi mspu' p'sa .T'jnn noipna 'jKni:;''^ 

.n'''7'73 riT-pon psno: .^i^ab myiT n'?Nn miiamir 
ni:;'?!:^'? niVinpa ,r\v.b^ ,^n-\ ,npn-i .mi:' ,mnaKn yanx 
■lasy msin qj dn 'r irr'^yi mDi2 pT s'? nii:''? nn3T:i niaxn 
niTanin r\^:L-\r^ nrannn ,Tnna '7yi nmyax bs ion 
K'H .D'onn nj3 iiin'? nniNin ijas ma? nrusn ,T':n3 
nyn'7 ysiz;' n'ju' lya'? 'jsyaiy riN a'nj'tt' amaxa nam 
■73» : D"-i3i<'? '1 ^212 n't'siia mil' b-w -ma'!:;n .pnx' '7y 

.(y-' S"D n'lLJN-in) "nVipa yac» mi:' !■? nasn ii:;k 
:n:aa a'pn niyVs .npm '71:' nb mo ns ni:"na min.i 
v,b XT! IS d"' T'3 r'ajsin) "iiDa D'a cya sj 'rsain,, 
'?3'7 D'a 3Kiy'7 Isa'? mna mn n'7'j rma'? .ni2 -psnon 
"r'jaj '7d'7 3Ki:'ni 2si:''r isi.t '7N iiy ^-ini» — vbm 

.('D T'D n-'i:'snn) 
■jy -iaiy'7 nyT" 'sam p'7 '7iy iir-na n'jij -la's npixn 
."D'mnn t3 n:i:'ii:'„'7 nnis mi:'a iiï-nan p'?i n'rma mnu 

.('a '3 D'TUTl Ti:') 








î^î^^: 



wMm 



rinDD 



^cui/itieô 




^aasâ 



Editor-in-chief Shifra Meyrowitz 

Art and layout editor Helen Prager 

Hebrew editor Tziona Abramson 

Literary editor Blanche Kronegoldi 

Business Manager Deanne Mayefsky 

Photography: 

Surella Roseman 
Beverly Stein 
Sheila Tennenbaum 

Biographies : 

Roslyn Francus 
Channy Kupietzky 
Evalyn Schiff 

Staff artist: 

Helene Nutkis 
Advisers : 

Art^-Mrs. E. Levinson 

English-Mr. P. Pearl 

Hebrew-Mr. A. Steif 



THE ELCHANET 






Rear, left to rigfit: R. Francus, E. Schiff, B. Stein, S. Tennen- 
baum, H. Nutkis. H. Prager. D. Mayefsky. B. KronegolJ. Seated: 
T. Abramson, Mr. Steif. Mrs. Levinson, Mr. Pearl, advisers; S. 
Meyrowitz. S. Roseman. 




Rear, left to right: J. Appleton, E. Berger, S. 
Zucker. Middle: J. Moskowitz. S. Gershinsky, 
P. Maza. R. Rothwax, M. Greenbaum, C. Silver- 
man. J. Brickman. R. JaskoII. Seated: S. Okun. 
Y. Sidon, A. Lazarus, R. Ulman. Editor-in-Chief; 
C. Romm. J. Tarlovt'e. Not shown: J. Sebrow, 
B. Wolf. Insert: Mr. Pearl, adviser. 



COURIER 



D\;:3D^ 



Rear, left to right: C. Etzion. P. Meskin, E. Stein- 
berger, J. Desser, S. Cfiarner. B. Frommer, S. Ger- 
shinsky. A. Leaf. Seated: C. Rothholz, S. Meyro- 
witz. P. Samuels. O. Chaimovic. editor; Mr. 
Steif. adviser. Not shown: G. Wiederkehr. 





ALIYA 



Rear. /c'/( fo ricjhi: B. Bicnstock. E. Stone, B. SKimoH. G 
Wolf, S. Meyiowitz, S. Rosen, B. Burstein, P. Meskin 
R. Ulman. Middle: F. Levitt, S. Jaroslawicz, S. Charner 
S. Levovitz, E. Offenbaclier, B. Gross, S. Weiss, M. ReiF 
man. Sealed: Mi. Steif, adviser; B. Friedman, president 
P. Samuels, secretary; L. Hess, vice president; R. Francus 
T. Abramson. Not shown: D. Kosiner, G. Weiderkehr, 





SERVICE SQUAD 



Rear, left to right: N. Wetzler, A. Scliarf, T. Gud, 
R. Aufseeser. C. Zyslcincl. A. Cohen, B. Korn, 
A. Hess. Middle: H. Brill. A. Nussbacher. J. Mos- 
kowitz, R. Goldberg. P. Goldfischer, E. Kamin- 
etzky, M. Reifman. Sealed.' B. Zauderer, V. Katz. 
S. Roseman. B. Krongoid, F. Grelier, E. Katz. 
Not shown : E. Kuhl, C. Rotliholz. Insert: G. 
Wiederkehr. captain. 




GUILD VOLUNTEERS 



Rear, left to right: S. Gershinskv, B. Bienstock. 
C. Romm. B. Frommer. J. Desser. D. Mayefsky. 
Middle: S. Roseman, G. Kamensk-y, V. Schon- 
leld, S. Bergman. S. Lifsnitz. R. Jaskoll. S. Kap- 
row. H. Eisenberg. Front: P. Cohen. R. Landes- 
man. A. Lazarus. P. Samuels, chairman; T. Le- 
vine. C. Silver. Not shown: T. Abramson. N. 
Cyperstein. J. Hochberger, S. Joseph. S. Weiss. 




G.O. FALL TERM 



Rear, left to right: B. Sclineid, S. Kolitch, L. Sei- 
clenfeld. L. Hocliberger. J. Sussman. G. Haper- 
korn. Middle: D. MayeFsky, D. Kosiner, R. Dy- 
kan. J. Weiss, R. Monderer. B. Davidowitz, C. 
Antman, A. Levy, R. Hamada, B. Beinstock. 
Sealed: R. Bergman, N. Wernick, S. Levovitz, 
B. Gross, S. Jaroslawicz, L. Strachman. 




Left to right: C. Sacns, sec- 
retary: B. ShimoFf, presi- 
dent; Mrs. Leyinson, ad- 
viser; C. Reichman, treas- 
urer; B. Burstein, vice pres- 
ident. 



G.O. SPRING TERM 



Rear, left to right: S. Kook, R. Levenstein, B. 
Nathan. E. Berger, J. Morgenstern, Tarlowe. 
Middle: F. Topor, J. Grossfiefild, J. Appleton, 
B. Beinstock, B. Rosenberg, L. Sternberg, S, 
Okun. Seated: R. Friedman, G, Haperkorn, B. 
Halpern. F. G. Hesman, B. Wolf, H. Scharten- 
berg. Not shown: J. Feuerstein, E. Haber, L. 
82 Sternberg. 





LIBRARY SQUAD 



Rear: E. Stone, E. Steinberger. J. Desser, R. 
Voehl, J. Sussman. Middle: Z. Nissel, G. Haper- 
korn. R. Stern, S. Gershinsky. A. Levy, S. Wis- 
nievvski, A. Kalichman. Sealed: L. Stracnman, 
E. OffenbacKer, captain; Rabbi Perlman, libra- 
rian; S. Levovitz, S. JaskoII. Front: R. Bergman. 



83 




BASKETBALL TEAM 



Rear, left to right: R. Schmookler, B. Rosenberg, 
R. Monaerer, M. Grossman. S. Kelman. L. Stern- 
berg, B. Solow, B. Wolf. Front; G. Epstein, R. 
Resmovits. C. Waaler, captain; J. Tarlowe, cap- 
tain; T. Ginsberg. S. Kolitch. 



i 


'I 




JS 


i(M 




S^:- 


*f i w' 


'^^SBSSi.. 


;*!>-->ïs;^ 


9- *• -«iSlii." 






CHEERING SQUAD 



Clockwise, from top: M. Kent, E. Offen- 
bacher, R. Teller, R. Goldberg, H. Kisen- 
berg. S. Bergman, captain; R. Bergman, 
B. Krakow, co-captain; S. Kaprow. T 
Spiegel. Not shown: R. Farkas, S. Kes- 
tenbaum. 



BOOSTERS 



Rear, left to right: V. Ramat, R. Levenstein, L. 
Nowak. B. Tersnel, H. Grauman. B. Gutfreund, 
S. Cohen. Third row: S. Pfeffer, N. Rosenbaum, 
P. Golclfiscber, P. Maza, G. Cabn, S. Rubin, 
E. Horowitz, E. Specter. Second row: D. Album, 
L. Alpert, B. Aboff. B. Schneid, coach; A. Fried- 
man, captain; J. Sussman. B. Halpern. Front: 



A. Teitz, P. Rutner, 
Fein, A. Scharf. 



J. Sonniker, J. Berger, D. 









Girls, did you 
make a Bracha? 



Best Wishes to Our Daughter 

JUDI 

MR. AND MRS. C. BENDHEIM 
and THE 6 B's 



I see you taugnt 
them footnotes and 
bibliography! 




Well, if this 
doesn't work, there 
is always teaching! 



Mazel Tov and Best Wishes to 



JOANNE 



MALDEN MILLS, INC. 
Knitted Fabrics 

Lawrence, Massachusetts 



With 30 credits, 
you too can do it! 






87 




Talking atout 
overcrowded 
classrooms . . 



Where did lie put 
that PINT? 



Best Wishes to 

ANI 

and THE CLASS OF "63 

MR. AND MRS. NATHAN HEYMAN 

MR. AND MRS. DAVID FREEDMAN 

and LEAH 



■^ 



What is this^ — a 
senior lounge? 




Mazel Tov and Best Wishes to 

S H EILA 

from your 

GRANDFATHER 

E. M. Goldfeder 

Johnstown, Pa. 

PARENTS 

Herman and Bertha Tennenbaum 

Leibel and Chumi 

UNCLES AND AUNTS 

Emil and Molly Tennenbaum 

Suzy, Vivian, Cheryl and Shimi 

Anatole and Chane Tennenbaum 
Manes, Brenda and Sherry 

Tennenbaum Caterers 

Oscar and Miriam Wagner and Reena 

Heat Sealing Novelties Company 

Rabbi Fishel and Ruth Goldfeder 
Yaakov, Soro and Avi 

Cincinnati, Ohio 

Leo and Eva Goldfeder 
Bayla and Teddy, Gerald and Sholom 

Harold and Reva Goldfeder 
Gary, Sheera and Chaim 

Metro Drug Company 

Shimon and Debby Goldstein 
Naftoli, Shaindy and Mordechai 

Forest Hills, N. Y. 

DEAREST FRIENDS 

Harry and Esther Resnicic 

Naomi, Tova, Yudi and Gila 



Notice tKe 
"sparkle" in her 
eyes? 



Best Wishes of 



Mrs. Sîgfrîed Bendheim 



Who ever said 
anything about 
girls being the 
weaker sex? 




'Now let me sa 
this about ihal" 



Mazel Tov to 

Cheryl Maza 

Rabbi and Mrs. J. Maza 

Phyllis, Sandra, Elliot, Alan 

Mr. and Mrs. A. Cain 

Mr. D. Goldstein, Mr. B. Tobier 

Mr. H. Wexler, Mr. H. Weclcsler 




Yaraslovsky? 



To . . . 

Hélène 

from 

Mr. and Mrs. I. Kleinman 

Mr. and Mrs. N. Harrison 
Mrs. L. Price 

Mr. and Mrs. D. Nutkis 

Mr. and Mrs. A. Nutkis 

Mr. and Mrs. H. Nutkis 



Best Wishes to 

Gayle Reisman 

Mr. and Mrs. Milton Reisman 
Steven, Janet and Carol 



DIMINISHING 
UTILITY?? 




"Mother please, I'd 
rather clo it 



Congratulations to the Class of 1963 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry Shapiro 



Congratulations and Best Wishes 
for Continuing Success to 

Gloria Wiederkehr 

Upon Her Graduation 
The Wiederkehr Family 



Aifoh BayLi? ? 




Congratulations and Best Wishes 


Mazel Tov to Our Daughter 


^H& 


Upon the Graduation of Our Daughter 


Surella Eve 


We' ve grown ' 
accustomed to 
her Bach . . . 


Denise 


and Her Classmates 




Mr. and Mrs. F. Doppelt and Barry 


Betty and Jack Roseman 





Congratulations to 

Bunny 

on Her Graduation 
Mommy, Daddy, Avi, and Babi 



May the Future Be Bright for 

Barbara 

and Her Classmates 
Rabbi and Mrs. Ephraim Shimoff and Eliot 




oil. Dr. Lewin! 



Compliments of 

Mr. Leonard Stern 



Best Wishes to Our Daughter and Sister 

Zahava 

in All Her Future Undertakings 

Mr. and Mrs. S. GLATSTEIN and SON 



Best of Luck to 



Sharon Kriger 



MOTHER, DAD, JERRY, and LYNNE 



Mozel Tov to Our Daughter 

Blanche 

MOM, DAD, HESHY, and MUTTY 



Congratulations to Our Daughter 

Judy 

and the Entire Senior Class 

from 

Mr. and Mrs. PAUL HOCHBERGER 

and Sister LINDA 



Best Wishes to 

Bessy Sylvia 

on Her Graduation 

Grandmother: Mrs. Mina Haberman 

Parents: Mr. and Mrs. Max Zouderer 

Brothers: Dr. and Mrs. Bert Zauderer and Jay 

Rabbi Dr. Erich Zauderer 



Mazel Tov and Best Wishes to 

Ruthîe 

on Her Graduation 

Mr. and Mrs. ELIAS MONDERER 
SONNY and ROSELYN 



Congratulations to 

Frances Levitt 

Mr. and Mrs. SIDNEY SHULMAN 



We nuist move 
alieaJ with great 

VIGAH . . ." 




B'racha V'hatzlacha to 

Gloria Wiederkehr 

UNCLE SEYMOUR and AUNT SHERYL 



Compliments of 

Mr. and Mrs. S. Ullrmann 




Sing along \ 
the slaves! 1 




IJ.in'r DTD "^TD- 

^.^^^>^'t'nn '^K'^'b^ 



OLE!! 



Compliments to 

Surella Roseman 



Wishing Continued Success to 
a Wonderful Class of Girls 

In+er-Sta+e Vending Company 



Congratulations to the Graduates 
Compliments of 

Edward Kuzon 

218 Crestview Circle 
Longmeadow, Mass. 



Continued Success to 
the Graduating Class 

Annalgamated Heat and Power Co. 



Maze! Tov to 

EVELYN 

Mr. and Mrs. S. SCHIFF and Sons 



Heartiest Congratulations to Our Daughter 

SANDRA 

MOMMY and DADDY 

. , . And ihe walls 
cnnie luniLIung 
down . . . 



What have you 
jj got to say there lo 
' ' — ^. yourself, partner? 



Compliments of 

Stanley E. Stern 



To 



Judi and Debby Bendheim 

Mr. and Mrs. L. JESSELSON 



In Honor of 

Beverly Stein 

THE ALPERT SISTERS 
Suzan Lois Bette Paya 



Congratulations to 

Blanche Kronegold 

L & W SPECIALTIES COMPANY 
Secaous, New Jersey 



f 



Oops, who let you 
in? 



Greetings 



To . . . 

Surella 

LORIET FASHIONS INC. 

Manufacturers and Creators of 
Handbags, Clutches and Novelties 



Congratulations to the Class of '63 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Shapiro 



From Admirers of 

Miss Joanne Feuers+ein 



You ve lost your 
locker privileges 
lor two weeks I 




"Raise your Iianc! 
if it is clean. " 



In Honor of Our Dear Friend 

FLORENCE GOLDSCHMIDT 



Mazel Tov and Best Wishes to 

BARBARA SCHACHNOW 

Upon Her Graduation 
MOM. DAD, MICHAEL, and GRANDMA 



Mazel Tov to Our Dear Daughter and Sister 

LEDA 

Mr. and Mrs. ISIDORE FRIEDMAN 
David and Lenny 



Congratulations to Our Granddaughter 

RONNI 

Mr. and Mrs. HARRY PERLMAN 



Good Luck to Our Daughter 

ESTHER 

Mr. and Mrs. A. KURZ 



f n n ■> 1 , r î^ ;; , K n X , r r 3 P ri 



Congratulations and Best Wishes 
to Our Daughter and Sister 

DEANNE 

and Her Classmates 
Mr. and Mrs. JUDAH H. MAYEFSKY and ROBERT 



Mazel Tov and Best Wishes to 

THE CLASS OF 1963 

DEBBY and MEL ADLER and GITTI 



They followed me 
here from 

UPTOWN! n2-i T^n"???- 



Congratulations and Best Wishes 
to Our Daughter 

SHEILA 

and Her Classmates 
Mr. and Mrs. JOSEPH A. ROSEN and SHELDON 



To... 

RONNI 

UNCLE JERRY 



Good Luck and 
Good Life to 

DEBBY TELSNER 

Rabbi and Mrs. David Telsner 



Congratulations to 
FRANCES LEVITT 
Mr. Julius Schulman 



To . . . 

ADELE NUSSBACHER 

ORMONDE RESIDENCE 

101 West 86th Street 

dooming House — Singles and Doubles 
Private Shower — Also KItchenttes 



Hearty Congratulations upon the Graduation of 

BESSY SYLVIA ZAUDERER 

NATIONAL FUEL TERMINALS, INC. 

54-15 48th Street— Maspeth 78, N. Y, 



Best Wishes to 

GAIL WOLF 

Mr. and Mrs. Wolf and Son 



Congratulations to 

FRANCES LEVITT 

Mrs. B. Levitt 



To MISS ADLERBLUM 

for Her Kindness, Patience 

and Understanding 

Joanne, Ani, Barbara, Grace, Fradi, 

Rivkah, Evelyn, Charlotte, Debby, 

and Bessy 



Congratulations to 

Our Daughter 

SIDA 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Weiss and Fannily 



To 

RIVKAH 

from 

Her Brother 



Congratluations to 
PAULA COHEN 

Kol-Tov Caterers 

798 Lydig Avenue 



To Our Favorite Niece 

and Cousin 

LEDA 

Mendel, Sarah, Yossy, Feige, 
and Bassie Shemtov 




AVIS KLUGHAUPT 

from 
Her Friends 



Boy, these math 
examples sure are 
tougK! 



Compliments of 


With Compliments 


EMPIRE STATE NOVELTY 


MR. & MRS. RANDOLPH KATZ 


CORPORATION 


8300 Talbat Street 


347 Fifth Avenue 


Kew Gardens, N. Y. 


Congratulations to 


Compliments to 


Our Daughter 


SARAH JOSEPH 


TZIONA 






Abe Solomon, Inc. 


Mr. and Mrs. Abramson 


Meats Supreme — Service Superior 


Congratulations to 


Congratulations to 


BUNNY 


ROSLYN 


on Her Graduation 


on Her Graduation 


Nat. Libby, Gil, and Essie 


Mom, Dad, and Allen 


Congratulations to 


SHEILA TENNENBAUM 


BARBARA 


M. & M. Fruit Market, Inc. 


and Her Classmates 


Fancy Fruits and Vegetables 


Mom, Dad and Sam 


14 First Avenue 






Congratulations to 
EVELYN 

and the Graduating Class 

Dr. and Mrs. I. Diamond and Family 



In Honor of 

REGINA GLUCK 

A Friend 



Best Wishes to 

SIDA WEISS 

Mr. and Mrs. B. Konigsberg 



Best Wishes to Our Niece 

and Granddaughter 

DEANNE 

Family Mayefsky 


Best Wishes to 

HELEN 

Mr. and Mrs. S. Stern 


Congratulations to 
My Niece 
BLANCHE 
Aunt Jenny 


"1 have terrific 

plans for wasting 

my time. " HHBi 

Congratulations to ^H 
DEBBY KOSINER 
Wegier Decorating Co., Inc. 


Best Wishes to 
SHIFRA 

Warren's Wines and Liquors 

175-25 Jannaica Avenue 
Jamaica 32, N. Y. 


Congratulations to 
MIRI REIFMAN 

and Her Classmates 
on Their Graduation 


Best Wishes and Good Luck 

to Our Granddaughter 

and Niece 

SIDA 


Congratulations and Best Wishes 

to Our Daughter 

SARAH 

Upon Her Graduation 

Her Loving Parents, 

Mr. and Mrs. Jaroslowitz 


Best Wishes to 
SANDRA HOROWITZ 

Compliments of 
A Friend 


Congratulations to 

Our Daughter 

CLAIRE 

and Her Classmates 

Mr. and Mrs. Horowitz 


Congratulations to 

ADELE KORN 

from 

Schochtim Union 

of Greater New York 


Congratulations to 
DEBBY TELSNER 

H. Tuchman Kosher Meats 

2385 Broadway 


Congratulations to 
CHARLOTTE 

Upon hier Graduation 

from 

Her Mother and Brothers 
Alvin and Harold 


Best Wishes to 

SUSAN KOOK 

from 

Her Family and Friends 


Mazel Tov to 

LEA 

on Her Graduation 

The Greenbergs 


Best Wishes to 
BLANCHE KRONESOLD 

John M. Fischer ^^H 

H 

"Smile, you're on ^UhKI 



Candid Camera! 



Best Wishes to 

ANITA and RUTHIE 

Uncle Murry Aunt Laura 

Teddy and Johnny Kahn 



Congratulations to Our Nieces 
RUTHIE and ANITA 
Claîre and Joe Stern 



Congratulations to 

ANITA 

Uncle Eugene and Aunt Esther 




Compliments to 
SANDRA HOROWITZ 



Who stole my 
lunch? 



Congratuatlons to Our Daughter 

NAOMI 

Upon Her Grauation 

Rabbi and Mrs. Cyperstein 



Congratuations and Best Wishes 

to Our Niece 

SURELLA 

Upon Her Graduation 

Uncle Morris and Aunt Tillie 
Uncle Bernie and Aunt Ruth 



Congratuations and 
Our Very Best Wishes to 

ANITA 
Mom, Dal, Sidney, and Joel 



Best Luck to 
THE GRADUATES 

Compliments of 
Bernard Freed 



Bracha Vehatzlacha 

to My Daughter 

ADELE 

Upon Her Graduation 

Mrs. M. Nussbacher 


Best of Luck to 

SANDRA HOROWITZ 

The Langs 


Congratulations to 

RONNI 

Uncle Morris and Aunt Mamie 


Congratulations to 
MIRI REIFMAN 
from Her Family 


Congratulations to 
DEANNE 

and the Graduating Class 

Izzy Goldman 


Best Wishes to 
BLANCHE KRONEGOLD 


Best Wishes from 
LEBOWITZ PINE VIEW HOTEL 

Fallsburg, N. Y. 


Mazel Tov and Best Wishes 

to Our Dear Niece and Cousin 

DEBORAH D. KOSINER 

The Three Beers 



mt^-ï r.niD P1313 ■? = 


SANDRA HOROWITZ 

Wishing You Continued Success 
MR. and MRS. ALFRED SCHOEN 


"I got my job ^ 
tkrough 'The New ^F 
York Times. ' ■ 

Congratulations to / 

BLANCHE KRONEGOLD 


Û 


B'racha V'hatziacha to 
ADELE NUSSBACHER 

Upon Her Graduation 
AUNT ROSE 


SHULAMITH LIFSHITZ 

from Jack's Fruit and Vegetable Market 


DEANNE MAYEFSKY 

from Stanley's Fish Market 


DEBORAH KOSINER 

from the Kosiners and Rosenthal 


DEANNE MAYEFSKY 

from Dr. and Mrs. S. Novogrodsky 


COMPLIMENTS 

from the Moller Family 


SHEILA TENNENBAUM 

from Clearfield Pharmacy 


HEDDA SILVER 

from Dr. G. Halperin 


BARBARA SCHACHNOW 

1 from Dr. F. Bernstein 


COMPLIMENTS 

from Betty Lee Beauty Salon 


HEDDA SILVER 

from Nat and Mary Saperstein 


FLORENCE GOLDSCHMIDT 

from a Friend 


GAIL WOLF 

from H. & B. Wolf 


FLORENCE and ANITA 

from Mr. and -Mrs. Morris Lifschitz 


CHARLOTTE SILVER 

from Ben Shedietsky 


SIDA WEISS 

from Philip and Eve Jacobs and Family 


ANITA SALZMAN 

from Aunt Régine and Uncle EIek 


SARAH JOSEPH 

from Nathan Resnick 


SURELLA ROSEMAN 

from Vision 


ANITA SALZMANN 

from Lunn Diamond Co. 


ELLEN STERN 

from Mr. and Mrs. Samson Vollweiler 


BESSY ZAUDERER 

from Leo's Hardware and Supply 


HELEN PRAGER 

from Rainbow Painting Corp. 


CLAIRE HOROWITZ 

from Mr. D. Horowitz 


SHEILA and DEANNE 

from 1. Goldberg and Sons 


HEDDA SILVER 

from Kosher Specialties, Inc. 

105 




When you care 
enough, give the 
very best. 




SHULAMITH LIFSHITZ 

from Jack and Murry Restaurants 

DEANNE MAYEFSKY 

from Mr. and Mrs, A. Roth and Family 

HEDDA SILVER 

from Camera Shop 

DEANNE and SHEILA 

from Hymie's Fruits and Vegetables 

COMPLIMENTS 

from Burnstein's Market 

COMPLIMENTS 

from Louis Desser 

ADELE NUSSBACHER 

from Franklin Pinckney 

HELEN PRAGER 

from Hugo Weinberg & Sons, Inc. 

ADELE KORN 

from Kraft Cleaners 

ADELE KORN 

from Derensky Bros. 



ANITA SALZMAN 

from Mr. and Mrs. K. Gittmann 

LEDA FRIEDMAN 

from Mr. and Mrs. S. Stock and Family 



COMPLIMENTS 

from Esther and Joseph Mandel 



RIVKIE LANDESMAN 

from Her Parents 



BARBARA GALLANT 

from the Huber Family 



BARBARA GALLANT 

from the Bergers 



BARBARA SCHACHNOW 

from Mintz Drugs 



BARBARA SCHACHNOV/ 

from I. Wertheimer 



SARAH JOSEPH 

from S. Ellenbogen 



SHEILA TENNENBAUM 

from Circle Bowling Recreation 



JUNE MESSINGER 



EVELYN SCHIFF 

from Mr. and Mrs. I. Spiro 



BEVERLY STEIN 

from A. Rick and Sons 



SANDRA WOLF 

Burg's Prescription Pharmacy, Inc. 



SANDRA WOLF 

from Pioneer Food Market 



SHIFRA MEYROWIYZ 

from the Blintza 



SHIFRA MEYROWITZ 

from Nemo Tile 



ADULT EDUCATION CLASS 

Bnei Israel of Midwood 



DEANNE MAYEFSKY 

from Gertz Brothers 



DEANNE MAYEFSKY 

from a Friend 



ADELE KORN 

from J. & S. FIsch 



BARBARA GALLANT 

from Aunt Sarah, Miriam and Larry 



DEANNE MAYEFSKY 

from Mr. and Mrs. M. Metzger and Family 



PAULA COHEN 

from Mr. and Mts. M. Grossbard 

PAULA COHEN 

from M & A Meat Company 

PAULA COHEN 

from Murray Hill Stationers 

LEDA FRIEDMAN 

from Mr. and Mrs. B. Weisler and Family 

ADELE KORN 

from Josef Meisels 

BARBARA SCHACHNOW 

from a Friend 

BARBARA GALLANT 

from the Gershans 






BLANCHE KRONEGOLD 

from George Thoike 



SUSAN KOOK 

from Leonard A, Sedell, D.D.S. 



CLAIRE HOROWITZ 

from Uncle Leo and Aunt Rebecca 



HELEN PRAGER 

from Fort George Jewelers 



HELEN PRAGER 

from Siggie's Butcher Store 



DEANNE MAYEFSKY 

from a Friend 



SIDA WEISS 

from a Friend 



FRANCES LEVITT 

from Dr. and Mrs. J. J. Hunwitz 



SHARON KRIGER 

from Mr. and Mrs. H. Friedman 



Send tKis girl to 
camp! 



SARAH JOSEPH 

from J. Relter 



HEDDA SILVER 

from Better Sight Vision Center 



HEDDA SILVER 

from Flaum and Nass 



ELLEN STERN 

from Mrs. T. Stern and Ronny 



ELLLEN STERN 

from Ginsberg's Market 



SHULAMITH LIFSHITZ 

from a Friend 



SHULAMITH LIFSHITZ 

from Viennese Upholstery 



% 



SANDRA HOROWITZ 

from Mindy, Judah, and Harry Aber 



SHIFRA MEYROWITZ 

from Ben Kurk 



DEANNE MAYEFSKY 

from a Friend 



x'^âi Yipee, tKe news- 
' iH paper strike is over! 



Best Wishes to 
HEDDA SILVER 

M. Fulco 

Painting Contractor 



GOOD LUCK AND BEST WISHES TO 

The Graduating Class 

THE STUDENT BODY 



Mazel Tov to 

Our Dear Teacher 

MISS RABINOWITZ 

on Her Engagement 

The Senior Class 



Congratulations to 

Our Classmate 
JUDI BENDHEIM 

on Her Engagement 



Printed by Easlern Press, Inc., 33 Flalbush Avenue, Brooklyn 17, 



STYLE-MODE FRENCH CLEANERS 



69-44 Main Street 
Kew Gardens Hills, L. 



Congratulations to 

FLORENCE 

and the Graduates of '63 

Mom, Dad, and Dave 



To FLORENCE 

with Love 

Ruth and Karl Schoer 



BONNIE NATHAN 

from Mother, Dad, and Judith 



FLORENCE GOLDSCHMIDT 

from Mr. and Mrs. M. Monderer 



Congratulations to 

Bonnie Nathan 



MR. GEORGE GOLD 

A. N. Bernstein, Inc. 

Insurance Brokers